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Editorials

Nashua aldermen vote was unusual

It’s probably not overstating it to say that the relationship between Nashua Mayor Donnalee Lozeau and the city’s police department is frosty, at best. Give Lozeau credit for this much, though: When it comes to the police department, she’s been consistent in ...

Hassan is right to take on bullying

Gov. Maggie Hassan’s decision to proclaim Nov. 18-33 as “anti-bullying week” in New Hampshire strikes us as a particularly creative and apt use of the “bully pulpit” that the governor has at her disposal. Using the governor’s office ...

School enrollment drops, spending doesn’t

Increases in student enrollment are often used by school administrators to justify increases in school budgets. Using the rationale that fewer pupils in a classroom generally means students can get more individualized help from a teacher, school officials have traditionally made the case that ...

Stay in the pink, know your risks

One month a year our lives are awash in pink. It floods sport stadiums in the form of socks, armbands, towels, cleats and gloves. It’s seen in ribbons that grace cars, posters and advertisements. It has even flooded the coupons in The Sunday Telegraph and the website of the Concord ...

Both sides must ready for change

The salient question, now that the federal government is back at work and debt default has been diverted, is whether anything meaningful has changed in Congress or if in a couple of months the country will once again face the prospects of fiscal and economic calamity as a consequence of ...

A look back at the week in news

Nashua candidate’s attempt to justify slur raises question The recent conduct of Peter Silva, Republican nominee for the Nov. 5 Nashua Ward 8 special election for state representative, raises an important ethical question. Is it a more serious moral breach to utter an ethnic slur, ...

Shaheen, Ayotte led the way out

We were reminded of the old saying that “politics is the art of compromise” by watching New Hampshire’s two U.S. senators during the fight to end government shutdown and raise the ceiling on how much the government can borrow. The actions of Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, ...

Hudson police should provide answers

When police are called to respond to a suicidal person, they have an obligation to act. When Hudson police were called to the home of Matthew Banks, they found a tube connected to the tailpipe of his car. They had evidence he tried to take his own life and had a duty to protect him. Instead, ...

Thicker skin would help

It was good to see the candidates for the Nashua Board of Aldermen gather last week at an event sponsored by the Nashua Republican City Committee to discuss the issues of the day. Some candidates talked about the perceived lack of transparency within city government and the belief by some ...

Take no comfort in ACA’s false start

The rollout of the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance exchange on Oct. 1 should have been the crowning achievement, to this point, of the presidency of Barack Obama. Millions of people without health insurance should have gone to www.HealthCare.gov, registered, and started to ...

Company seems to shoot self in foot by firing armed employee

One way or the other, we suspect life is about to change for the man who brought a firearm to his job at a Shell convenience store in Nashua over the holiday weekend. It turns out that Shannon “Bear” Cothran used his legally-concealed handgun to scare off a would-be robber ...

Common Core might not matter

A pair of commentaries in Sunday’s edition of The Telegraph took opposing viewpoints about the Common Core state standards that have been adopted by 45 states, including New Hampshire, and the District of Columbia. After reading the article from Nashua Superintendent Mark ...

Reopening government won’t be enough to restore faith

You are Congress, and while you might yet salvage the full faith and credit of the United States by avoiding a default on the country’s obligations, you have broken faith with the people who elected you. Polls say your approval rating is in the single digits. One wonders why it is ...

Lights out for NH higher education

New Hampshire’s college graduates leave school with more debt than those of any other state, according to a new study that delivers a series of body blows to the illusion that the state encourages its kids to go to college. New Hampshire is also among the nation’s grayest ...

Give recess ban a time out

Our initial thought when we heard that the game of tag had been banned from recess at Nashua’s Charlotte Avenue Elementary School was, we imagine, the same as a lot of other people: Sounds a little extreme. Our second thought was more a series of thoughts. What next? A prohibition ...

Many deserve credit for budget surplus

Who deserves credit for last week’s news that the state of New Hampshire ended the 2011-13 biennium with a $76 million surplus? There seems to be no shortage of candidates. Partisans of Gov. Maggie Hassan would like you to believe that, since the news was announced on her watch, the ...

Granite State gets economics lesson

Free-market advocates like to say that the market should decide which business entities survive and which don’t, though many sang a different tune in 2008 when some of their favorite financial institutions were about to go under and the federal government stepped in with bailout ...

Real needs met by good deeds

Income inequality has never been greater in the United States than it is right now. But then, you might have felt that in your family budget, unless you are among the richest 1 percent of Americans. Those at the very top saw their incomes rise 31.4 percent between 2009 and 2012, according to ...

Landfill for the criminally inclined

There was a time in this country when we treated our rivers like sewers. Items flushed down the toilet made their way straight into the nearest rivers, rendering many of them unfit for swimming, fishing or other recreational pursuits. Thankfully, that’s largely no longer the case, ...

Who pays for a $125 free dinner?

As we learned with Sen. Peter Bragdon’s recent tin-eared attempt to hang onto his Senate presidency after being picked to manage the Local Government Center’s multimillion-dollar municipal insurance risk pools, the New Hampshire Legislature’s ethics rules are more ...