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Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Red Sox now lower-tier – time to cut prices!

Alan Greenwood

Having been numbed to the reality of increasingly absurd ticket prices in every big league, fans may also have been numbed to one of the more brazen gimmicks used to wring out a few more dollars from the beleaguered masses.

Tiered ticket pricing has been around for awhile. For those who haven’t been victimized by it, tiered pricing sets the value of a ticket higher when the home team hosts a so-called premium opponent. Many teams, the defending World Series champions being one of them, go so far as to charge more for weekend games. ...

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Having been numbed to the reality of increasingly absurd ticket prices in every big league, fans may also have been numbed to one of the more brazen gimmicks used to wring out a few more dollars from the beleaguered masses.

Tiered ticket pricing has been around for awhile. For those who haven’t been victimized by it, tiered pricing sets the value of a ticket higher when the home team hosts a so-called premium opponent. Many teams, the defending World Series champions being one of them, go so far as to charge more for weekend games.

For instance, on their next homestand, the Red Sox are selling seats atop The Wall for between $190 and $230 for their Thursday night game against Houston. One night later, and for the duration of the weekend, those seats will run you between $240 and $330. Standing room atop The Wall will jump from $60 to $80.

Smart shoppers will await the arrival of the Los Angeles Angels on Monday, Aug. 18, with prices dropping back to the weekday levels.

If the abomination of tiered pricing isn’t going away, they could at least apply it fairly. As long as the Red Sox are in last place, recognize that by slashing all ticket prices for the rest of the season.

JETER IS BETTER: After all those years of nasty chants and vile T-shirts, it was nice to see Derek Jeter get some love from the Fenway fans over the weekend. When the Yankees come to town to end their regular season, the Red Sox will, no doubt, send Jeter on his way with a tremendous video board tribute to his exemplary career. It is also a safe bet that the fans will treat him to a series of raucous ovations.

If time doesn’t heal all wounds, performance certainly settles all debates, like the one raging 17 years ago as to who leads Major League Baseball’s amazing class of young shortstops – Jeter, Nomar Garciaparra and Alex Rodriguez.

MONEY, MONEY, MONEY, MONEY: Michael Phelps would insist that his return to competitive swimming is fueled by an unquenchable competitive thirst. That may even be partially true.

It doesn’t hurt, though, when swimsuit companies are vying for your endorsement, with one willing to pony up $1 million to wear theirs. Phelps dropped his deal with Speedo and signed on with a company named Aqua Sphere.

If only a maker of jeans would give him $2 million to wear some old-fashioned cut-offs.

TIME TRAVEL: Aug. 6, 1984 – The Monday afternoon sports section featured Richard Petty’s appearance at the Hudson Speedway. With the track in Loudon still a decade removed from the massive expansion that turned it into a NASCAR venue, racing’s royalty offered New Hampshire fans meet-and-greet opportunities such as Petty’s night at Hudson.

As reported by venerable Nashua Telegraph scribe Sandy Bucknam, “Petty could do no better than 10th in the pair of 25-lap feature races in front of a packed house squeezed into Hudson Speedway for the second annual Budweiser Showdown of Champions.”

Coffey Post clinched at least a tie for a spot in the American Legion baseball state tournament with a 12-9 win over Claremont. Steve Piwowarski picked up the win, Phil Stephens had three hits and three RBIs and Pat Madigan had a pair of hits, including a triple, and four RBIs.

And the Nashua Pirates topped Buffalo, 5-0, before 764 fans at Holman Stadium.

To put that in perspective, the Silver Knights are averaging 1,265 tickets sold per game this season.

Ah, remember the days when the Eastern League allowed teams to play in ballparks in which most of the seating consisted of bare, concrete slabs?

Alan Greenwood can be reached at 594-6427 or agreenwood@nashuatelegraph.com. Also, follow Greenwood on Twitter (@Telegraph_AlanG).