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Sunday, June 29, 2014

Celtics get Smart, go Young, need more

Alan Greenwood

Most of the sharpies who predict, then assess, each team’s draft day performance seem to think the Celtics gained a fair measure of talent with the sixth and 17th picks.

Perusing the NBA draft grades, Danny Ainge earned himself an A or B-plus, which would’ve made some of us feel downright giddy as undergrads. ...

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Most of the sharpies who predict, then assess, each team’s draft day performance seem to think the Celtics gained a fair measure of talent with the sixth and 17th picks.

Perusing the NBA draft grades, Danny Ainge earned himself an A or B-plus, which would’ve made some of us feel downright giddy as undergrads.

These draft critiques are sprinkled from one end of the Web all the way back to Al Gore’s research lab. So, anyone who wants details on all of them, tell the family you’ll be back in a couple of months and start surfing.

Ainge picked a point guard named Marcus Smart, doing a great favor for headline writers across America. He was quick to point out that Smart can also play as a shooting guard, making all discussions of Rajon Rondo’s future a little spicier.

With pick No. 17, Ainge took a shooting guard named James Young, who is also said to be capable of playing small forward.

(The draft gurus speak only in numbers – “Is he a 1 or a 2? They could really use a 3.” – but English majors, hoping to save the language from total destruction, prefer words.)

Since most of the self-proclaimed gurus are known for watching a dozen college hoop games simultaneously each day before March dawns, their analysis stands as a measuring stick for when the rookies step on the parquet for the first time.

The one indisputable fact: As expected, the Celtics will not be the Celtics again this season, or next, unless there is a franchise-changing player available on the free agent market, and Wyc Grousbeck wants to spent zillions of dollars.

All such NBA royalty, except one, is certainly welcome here.

Sox getting quicker

For the first time in decades, the Red Sox are finishing games in three hours, sometimes even less.

It doesn’t happen every night, but Friday in the Bronx, they came in at 3:05.

See, there is an upside in having a .243 team batting average.

A Red Sox-Yankees game finishing in 185 minutes is no less a feat than setting a land-speed record driving a 10-year-old Saturn. Not that anyone driving a 10-year-old Saturn would go faster than 55, naturally.

Denial flows aimlessly

Luis Suarez, from his home on another planet, insists he did not bite anyone during the World Cup incident for which he was sentenced by FIFA to a four-month suspension.

He actually insists he fell into Italy’s Giorgio Chiellini. And, Suarez said, he endured as much or more pain than Chiellini, citing “a small bruise on my cheek and a strong pain in my teeth.”

This man has a future in politics.