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Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Notion that Lebron James isn’t in it for the money is laughable

Alan Greenwood

During one stretch of cooing over the sheer greatness of His Highness during the NBA Finals, the troika of ABC announcers agreed with the notion that “LeBron James is not in this for the money.”

Exploding that fable takes little effort. Professional athletes are in it for the competition, the fame and the money, occasionally in that order, but not always. ...

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During one stretch of cooing over the sheer greatness of His Highness during the NBA Finals, the troika of ABC announcers agreed with the notion that “LeBron James is not in this for the money.”

Exploding that fable takes little effort. Professional athletes are in it for the competition, the fame and the money, occasionally in that order, but not always.

By the way, there is nothing wrong with that. Wailing over how much these guys are paid to play has become a quaint, but pointless exercise. The owners pay it because they have calculated it as a good business decision. The players accept it because only an idiot would turn down an opportunity to become wealthy by playing a game in which they are especially talented.

Until a player joins a new team and insists that they not pay him anything, it is, and will always be about the money, at least in large part.

So, for once and perhaps the only time, there will be no criticism of James here. Whether he ends up back in Miami, or in Chicago, or in Los Angeles, it is a decision he is completely free to make.

If he abandons the Heat and the fools in Miami are driven batty with the echoes of “Not one, not two, not three, not four ...” ringing in the heads, they are free to jeer the next time they see him.

And if ESPN wants to toss a few dollars his way for the right to produce The Decision II, the Worldwide Leader in Slobbering Over Superstars deserves every rhetorical jab it gets.

CELTICS’ NEXT MOVE: Is there a Mel Kilper-like man ready to bore us for hours on end on what NBA teams could, should or won’t do in Thursday’s draft? If such a self-proclaimed draft guru is out there, please stand and be heard – for no more than 10 seconds – on the Celtics’ choices.

Danny Ainge seems to backing away from the table atop which the Minnesota Timberwolves have placed Kevin Love. If that means he is going to go right ahead and use picks No. 6 and No. 17 to take the best college kids available, then does nothing more between now and training camp, the only certainty would be that Celtics fans will have to live with this reconstruction project going at a snail’s pace for several years.

Jeez, maybe Ainge can try tanking again next year. But, this time, Ainge should make sure he stops the win meter at 12 games.

TIME TRAVEL: The Red Sox’ struggles have surely caused many fans to yearn for football, and there will be a taste of it available Saturday at 1 p.m. in the second CHaD Football game, at Saint Anselm College.

On June 25, 1964, the lead story on the sports page reported that the Nashua High School-Manchester Central game would be switched from a Sunday afternoon to Friday night, Oct. 23, at The Athletic Field (aka, Gill Stadium).

“The shift to Friday night, becoming more and more prevalent with schoolboy football teams everywhere, marks a record number of six Friday night games for the Purple in 1964,” the story reported.

Elsewhere on the page, Johnny Pesky’s Red Sox languished in seventh place at 32-36. Pesky was fired with two games left in the club’s 72-90 season, replaced by Billy Herman.

That really worked out well. In 1965 they were 62-100.

Alan Greenwood can be reached at 594-6427 or agreenwood@nashuatelegraph.com. Also, follow Greenwood on Twitter (@Telegraph_AlanG).