Saturday, November 1, 2014
My Account  | Login
Nashua;42.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/nskc.png;2014-11-01 02:04:02
Sunday, November 24, 2013

Average American consumes 4,500 calories on Turkey Day

Joe Marchilena

It’s that time again, time to sit down with the relatives and collectively cram your face with turkey and stuffing and pumpkin pie and seven different kinds of potatoes.

It’s Thanksgiving, the one holiday where the celebration involves seeing who can eat the most without getting sick. Well, unless you consider the hot dog eating contest an important part of the Fourth of July. ...

Sign up to continue

Print subscriber?    Sign up for Full Access!

Please sign up for as low as 36 cents per day to continue viewing our website.

Digital subscribers receive

  • Unlimited access to all stories from nashuatelegraph.com on your computer, tablet or smart phone.
  • Access nashuatelegraph.com, view our digital edition or use our Full Access apps.
  • Get more information at nashuatelegraph.com/fullaccess
Sign up or Login

It’s that time again, time to sit down with the relatives and collectively cram your face with turkey and stuffing and pumpkin pie and seven different kinds of potatoes.

It’s Thanksgiving, the one holiday where the celebration involves seeing who can eat the most without getting sick. Well, unless you consider the hot dog eating contest an important part of the Fourth of July.

If you had to guess, how many calories would you say you consume on Thanksgiving?

The Calorie Control Council has an idea, and it estimates that the average American consumes more than 4,500 calories on Thanksgiving. Oh, and also, 229 grams of fat.

Another council, the American Council on Exercise, says that a person who weighs 160 pounds would have to run moderately for four hours, swim for five hours or walk 30 miles to burn off a Thanksgiving feast.

So how do you avoid overindulgence on a holiday that promotes eating like you haven’t in days?

Start by treating the day like any other, even though it isn’t. Have a normal breakfast and continue you normal routines, if you can. That way, you avoid snacking before the meal, and overeating during it.

If your day includes multiple stops and eating more than one Thanksgiving meal, don’t have seconds. If you really do need an extra helping, ask your host for a doggie bag and enjoy it all again after you’re done shopping on Black Friday. If someone is going to get upset that you’re not stuffing yourself on their feast, be thankful it’s a relative you won’t have to see again until next month’s holiday.

If you’re making a dish, or the entire meal, find ways to sneak in healthier foods and ingredients. Use some real cranberries instead of the stuff that comes in the can, or use quinoa or brown rice in your stuffing. Your desserts might be a little different, but try replacing regular baking flour with whole wheat, gluten free or sprouted flour.

This year, I’m going to attempt a preemptive strike. I’ve signed up to run the Fisher Cats’ Thanksgiving Day 5K in Manchester on Thursday morning. At last count, there were 16 races listed in New Hampshire at CoolRunning.com, so you’ve got plenty of options if a pre-feast solo exercise isn’t in the cards.

Instead of falling asleep on the couch to the sweet sounds of a football game, try to get your game started. Or if that’s not possible, then go for a walk.

And if there’s no stopping you from overindulging on Thanksgiving, then leave the car at home when you go shopping the next day. Walking from store to store will help you beat the traffic anyway.

Joe Marchilena writes a weekly fitness column for Hampshire Hills. To find out more information about the “90 Day Commit to Get Fit” program, call 603-673-7123 or email hhinfo@hampshirehills.com.