Thursday, December 18, 2014
My Account  | Login
Nashua;37.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/novc.png;2014-12-18 21:10:52
Sunday, September 29, 2013

Hunters truly appreciate all that nature has to offer

Orange leaves sift through the brisk air while the scraggly gnarl of a wild apple tree holds forth it’s dangling display of fruit touched by the early mornings powered sugar appearing frost.

The ground beneath a maple lies blanketed with a leafy covering of browns and reds, the future compost of life for the tree itself. High overhead a “V” of southbound geese wing in cadence; their journey only begun for another season. ...

Sign up to continue

Print subscriber?    Sign up for Full Access!

Please sign up for as low as 36 cents per day to continue viewing our website.

Digital subscribers receive

  • Unlimited access to all stories from nashuatelegraph.com on your computer, tablet or smart phone.
  • Access nashuatelegraph.com, view our digital edition or use our Full Access apps.
  • Get more information at nashuatelegraph.com/fullaccess
Sign up or Login

Orange leaves sift through the brisk air while the scraggly gnarl of a wild apple tree holds forth it’s dangling display of fruit touched by the early mornings powered sugar appearing frost.

The ground beneath a maple lies blanketed with a leafy covering of browns and reds, the future compost of life for the tree itself. High overhead a “V” of southbound geese wing in cadence; their journey only begun for another season.

Gray squirrels scurry noisily through the fallen leaves collecting the essential stores to see them through the approaching winter. Down in the alder bottoms a lone woodcock probes for earthworms in the soft umber moistness, the sustenance of energy that will carry him on a migration of many miles to the winter warmth of Louisiana. All about the signs are unmistakable, no naturalists eye is needed to tell you it’s the season of transition – autumn.

Autumn – the word colors the mind with a wash of red and orange scenery, yellow golden light shining down through birch leaves, brisk blue sky and the fading of green as natures last hurrah of brilliance dazzles us in farewell before settling in for the somberness of winters season colorless time.

Apples crisp and tart, pumpkins waiting for someone’s imagination or culinary skills as part of the varied bounty of a local farm’s harvest. Autumn brings out the strong instinct within each of us to satisfy the strong gatherer instinct buried deep within our genetic makeup. The fall season also awakens another survival instinct buried deep within our genetic make-up. The hunting instinct still exists within us all, but obviously stronger in some of us than others but still burning nevertheless. The hunter in this day and age is, to many people, an anachronism.

An individual marching to a different drummer – a drum beat that many no longer hear or even attempt to understand the simplicity of its syncopation.

To answer the genetic call of one’s ancestral heritage, to share in the kindred spirit of past generations of man as he set about surviving in a natural world is a totally unique and singular experience. To know that you retain the ability to fend for yourself if all else fails in modern society, is to inwardly realize a certain sense of independence from the daily 9-to-5 as we know it today. Hunters are indeed fortunate for they know a piece of the mysterious puzzle that is this adventure we call life.

A truly successful hunter is an individual who has learned the natural order of this world, an individual who questions that which is answerable and appreciates that which remains unrevealed. Most hunters I know long ago learned the value of retaining our natural resources and the negative impact that mankind has placed upon our fragile ecosystem.

A good hunter cares deeply for the game that is pursued, understands the meaning of the hunter’s role as a harvester of a renewable resource and ensures a fair chase with a swift and humane conclusion. Hunters, as a group, take on a responsibility far in excess of their overall impact on game populations In every case of a huntable species, hunters have been leaders in establishing regulations and stocking programs to ensure continuation of a healthy resource.

Sportspeople, through various organizations such as Ducks Unlimited, Trout Unlimited and National Wildlife Federation, work tirelessly to maintain and develop the myriad habitats that benefits hunted and non-hunted species of wildlife alike. Autumn brings out the strongest of this hunter instinct just as surely as the changing of the season brings out the colors on the trees.

After all is said and done, hunters as a general portion of the populace are not the negative group that they are often portrayed as but actually very positive contributors to an eco-system sadly in need of understanding and caring.

The extremely small percentage of hunters that are the bad apples in an otherwise healthy orchard sadly needing to be culled, not held up as an example of what is wrong with hunting today.

Hunters supply a hundredfold to all wildlife in general in comparison to the small harvest they take on an annual basis. Hunting is not an illness of our natural world and certainly hunters are not the wastrels of our animal resources. The time has passed for hiding the real problems and threats to our wild resources behind the emotional, hysterical and mythical smokescreen of pointing the finger of blame at hunters.

It is long past the time to come to grips with the real responsibilities for our current environmental conditions – ignorance of the issues involved and our modern way of life.