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Saturday, January 7, 2012

Santorum advocated intelligent design, too

Letter to the Editor

Kudos to The Telegraph for David Brooks’ article about vague bills in the New Hampshire Legislature that “seek to dilute the teaching of evolution in public schools” (Jan. 2: “Lawmakers zero in on science theory”).

Intelligent design, or creationism, would be required as part of the science curriculum, if these measures pass.

Bad enough that two state representatives are so misguided about true science, but Rick Santorum sponsored an amendment to federal legislation with the same provision.

It, too, called for intelligent design to be part of school curricula under the No Child Left Behind Act. Mercifully, Santorum’s effort did not become law.

This is a clarion call to reject a presidential candidate whose understanding of basic science is so limited. Santorum also wrote the foreword for a 2006 book honoring the so-called father of intelligent design, something he describes as “a legitimate scientific theory that should be taught in science classes.”

Before the primary, people should understand this and other less publicized aspects of Santorum’s positions: questioning the needs and motives of families in which both parents work; that there is no right to privacy in the Constitution, honoring the founder of Opus Dei with a speech in Rome. My own experience with the secret attempted recruitment of my minor daughter lingers unpleasantly even after many years.

There’s conservative, and then there’s Santorum, distorted beyond reason and electability. Five years ago, he lost his U.S. Senate seat by 18 percentage points, the widest margin of defeat ever for that position.

Carolyn Disco

Merrimack