Disenfranchised

Our system for electing representatives disenfranchises more than a third of the voting population.

I recently ran for New Hampshire State Representative in Ward 8. I did not get elected. No Republicans in Ward 8 were elected – despite the fact that about 1/3 of the voters voted Republican. But since each voter was allowed to vote for three candidates, it had the same affect as a winner-take-all election – all the Democrats voted for their three candidates at once.

Rather it should be set up so that each voter only votes for one candidate – and then the Top 3 candidates are chosen (this would allow for one Republican to have been elected and so given all of the voters in the Ward a representative who would in fact actually represent them).

As it stands now, my so-called representative may not vote as I would on any upcoming bills, will ignore my emails and just vote the Democratic Party line. It should be noted that this is happening all across the country – and it happens to both Republicans and Democrats. As our nation’s population is approximately half Republican and half Democrat, my guess would be that about 1/3 of the voters end up being ignored by their representatives because they live in a ward, district, county or state in which their party is in the minority. So we feel disenfranchised and even ignored. This, of course, adds to the bitter divisiveness and polarity in our nation. One third of the people are not truly represented. How do you think we feel when we mail or call our “representatives” and get a form letter in response indicating that they will only vote the party line — nothing we do or say will convince them otherwise.