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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Market Basket battle about clash of values

Letter to the Editor

The Market Basket situation is much more than a skirmish between factions of a family-owned business. It is a feud between greed and compassion in the corporate world and the values of its people.

Recently, National Public Radio reviewed a survey of 10,000 high school students done by the Harvard School of Education asking which was more important, success or caring. Eighty percent of these students said success, noting that their parents praised them far more for their good grades and athletic accomplishments than for their kind acts. For those of us who see the Bible as more of parables for our actions than as documentation of literal events, ironically, or perhaps more, the lesson three weeks ago was the feeding of the 5,000. ...

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The Market Basket situation is much more than a skirmish between factions of a family-owned business. It is a feud between greed and compassion in the corporate world and the values of its people.

Recently, National Public Radio reviewed a survey of 10,000 high school students done by the Harvard School of Education asking which was more important, success or caring. Eighty percent of these students said success, noting that their parents praised them far more for their good grades and athletic accomplishments than for their kind acts. For those of us who see the Bible as more of parables for our actions than as documentation of literal events, ironically, or perhaps more, the lesson three weeks ago was the feeding of the 5,000.

Jan Reist

Milford