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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Nashua should do more for its seniors

Letter to the Editor

Congratulations to the Town of Hudson and its senior citizens, who have opened the doors to their new senior center. Like Manchester, Salem and Pelham, Hudson’s selectmen recognize the value of a senior center to the community and have agreed to pay salaries, utilities and other operational expenses to ensure that the center can provide its members with programs and activities at a minimal cost.

Nashua’s elected officials, however, have not adopted that philosophy, despite the fact that the number of people over the age of 65 has increased to 19.6 percent of the population. Yes, they floated a bond to build the senior center, but the senior center must raise approximately $300,000 a year to remain in operation. ...

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Congratulations to the Town of Hudson and its senior citizens, who have opened the doors to their new senior center. Like Manchester, Salem and Pelham, Hudson’s selectmen recognize the value of a senior center to the community and have agreed to pay salaries, utilities and other operational expenses to ensure that the center can provide its members with programs and activities at a minimal cost.

Nashua’s elected officials, however, have not adopted that philosophy, despite the fact that the number of people over the age of 65 has increased to 19.6 percent of the population. Yes, they floated a bond to build the senior center, but the senior center must raise approximately $300,000 a year to remain in operation.

All programs, salaries, utilities and other operational expenses at the Senior Activity Center in Nashua are provided through fundraising by the members, staff and board of directors – plus private donations and small grants.

It can’t be a question of money, because the city pays for an administrator as well as utilities at the Hunt Building (on Library Hill), and we all know how busy they are.

So what can the problem be? Maybe you should call your alderman and ask what they can do to make Nashua seniors a priority.

Patricia Francis,

Nashua