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Nashua;42.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/ovc.png;2014-10-31 08:09:19
Monday, June 16, 2014

Moose are hurting in NH

Letter to the Editor

I recently learned that moose in New Hampshire are in trouble. Real trouble.

This past spring, 14 of 22 moose calves that were radio-collared in January by the Fish and Game Department died by the end of winter from having too many ticks. That is a 64 percent mortality rate and one that is killing off our moose. ...

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I recently learned that moose in New Hampshire are in trouble. Real trouble.

This past spring, 14 of 22 moose calves that were radio-collared in January by the Fish and Game Department died by the end of winter from having too many ticks. That is a 64 percent mortality rate and one that is killing off our moose.

In fact Fish and Game will only be issuing 124 moose hunting permits next week, down more than 80 percent from nearly 700 issued just seven years ago. Yes, our moose are in trouble because of the warming of our winters. It was the mild winter of 2013 that spiked the tick population to kill off the moose this winter.

Plus, I learned that our extremely hot spring temperatures are also causing a decline in mother moose weights. For instance, over the weekend we had temperatures in the mid 80’s. Moose do not feed when temperatures get that high. Our moose just gave birth to calves within the past couple of weeks and because of the heat may not be feeding to produce milk for their calves, resulting in more calf deaths.

We must help our moose. Just a week ago the Environmental Protection Agency was doing just that by calling for a significant reduction in carbon from existing power plants. I call on our senators and congresswomen to support the EPA’s efforts to help our moose. Won’t you?

Sandy Blanchard

Loudon