Editorials

Nashua soup kitchen vote leaves a bad taste

When the Nashua Planning Board next meets Nov. 1, we suspect there will be no shortage of items on the agenda, especially since its meeting originally scheduled for Oct. 18 has been canceled. We wish we could suggest one more: a reconsideration of last week’s disheartening vote that ...

Nashua School District credit card policy strikes right balance

One of the daily challenges for municipal boards and committees is finding the right balance between setting policy and micromanaging those entrusted to carry it out. We believe the Board of Education’s Finance and Operations Committee met that challenge last week when it agreed to ...

Nashua aldermen should vote ‘no’ (politely) on rudeness fines

Truth be told, when we first editorialized against talk of legislation that would impose fines on aldermen for rude behavior, we never thought such an ordinance would see the light of day (Aug. 29: “Can’t aldermen behave without threat of fine?”) Yet here it is ...

Bronstein residents deserve answers

It’s time the officials at Nashua Housing Authority stop being coy. At the recent Telegraph community forum after a series of stories called Beyond Bronstein, the experts agreed that the key to the housing authority’s plan to demolish the Bronstein apartments is involving ...

NH must adapt to keep advantage

New Hampshire is at a crossroads. The policies and philosophies that guided its economic success for three-plus decades may not be the ones to ensure its prosperity for the next three. A month before voters choose a new government, it’s important for candidates to spell out what they ...

Report questions taxes, growth link

At one campaign stop after another, Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney has been telling voters that “I know how to create jobs.” Mr. Romney has not yet disclosed the fine points of his plan, but the guts of it are tax cuts. In the short run he would maintain ...

Romney did what he needed at debate

It’s difficult to imagine events going any better for Mitt Romney during Wednesday’s presidential debate. He was passionate, well-schooled with facts and chock full of pithy rhetoric – three important attributes missing from President Barack Obama’s ...

Times’ Sulzberger lasting news legacy

“There’s no shortage of news in this world. If you want news, you can go to cyberspace and grab out all this junk. But I don’t think most people are competent to become editors, or have the time or the interest.” – Arthur Ochs Sluzberger, ...

Debates unlikely to swing the election

Televised debates haven’t always been a staple of presidential elections. After Richard Nixon’s zombie-like performance against John F. Kennedy in 1960, it took 16 years before Gerald Ford agreed to debate Georgia Gov. Jimmy Carter. The result was another disaster for the ...

Amendment risks separation of powers

Speaker Bill O’Brien and the N.H. House Republican leadership fashion themselves as intrepid apostles of conservative ideals, but sometimes, it’s difficult to make sense of what they truly believe in. Case in point is the proposed amendment to the New Hampshire Constitution ...

Sidewalk fuss not just about bricks

Watching discussions rage over the installation of new sidewalks downtown is beyond troubling; it begs the question of whether certain city leaders have Nashua’s best interest at heart. Or, worse, that when real opportunity presents itself in the form of business development or ...

Nashua transgender case a teachable moment

There was a time when public school policymakers didn’t have to worry about ordering in drug-sniffing dogs to whiff at lockers, hiring police “resource” officers to ensure student safety or negotiating legal settlements with the parents of transgender ...

GOP health ideas need some work

As a campaign slogan, “Repeal and replace” is this election’s version of “Drill, baby, drill” – a Republican battle cry that voters should ignore because it’s not the answer to America’s health care problems. ...

Charter school moratorium was avoidable

Bud Abbott and Lou Costello have made a lot of people laugh over the years with their famous “Who’s on First” comedy routine from the late 1930s, but few bothered to crack a smile last week over a more serious breakdown in communication that led to a moratorium on ...

Judge got it right on out-of-state college voters

Forty years ago, a federal judge ruled that New Hampshire could not prohibit out-of-state college students from voting here on the grounds that they didn’t intend to remain after graduation. Seven years later, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a similar ruling in United States v. Symm, ...

Clock winding down on the NFL’s integrity

Football fans who stayed up late Monday night had front-row seats to an extraordinary moment. The National Football League, long regarded as the Tiffany of professional sports operations for its ability to churn cold cash and maintain its sparkling image with cool efficiency, lay naked and ...

Prescription drug abuse back in the spotlight

When The Telegraph embarked on its “Rx Addiction Epidemic” series this summer, we did so to raise public awareness of prescription drug abuse in America and to initiate a conversation closer to home on what can be done about it. So we’ve taken great interest in ...

Road less traveled has happy ending in Litchfield

Perhaps lost in the negativity of what stands for political discourse these days was a positive local story that deserves some commentary before it gets buried under an avalanche of, well, more “political discourse.” As government stories go, they don’t come ...

World events rewrite campaign playbooks

While the presidential election has focused mainly on whether President Barack Obama or Republican challenger Mitt Romney has the better plan for reducing the nation’s debt while reinvigorating the economy, circumstances beyond the candidates’ control have sent strong ...

Money in politics needs closer look

Regardless of the outcome of November’s election, the 2012 presidential race has made history in at least one significant way. With President Barack Obama and his Republican challenger Mitt Romney turning down public financing in the primary and general elections, it is the first ...