Friday, November 21, 2014
My Account  | Login
Nashua;33.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/few.png;2014-11-21 11:29:29
Saturday, August 2, 2014

Looking back at the week in news

Telegraph Editorial

‘Pledge’ event makes for
bad political theater in NH

The political silly season shifted into high gear this week as evidenced by the dog-and-pony show the state chapter of Americans for Prosperity staged at the Legislative Office Building on Wednesday. ...

Sign up to continue

Print subscriber?    Sign up for Full Access!

Please sign up for as low as 36 cents per day to continue viewing our website.

Digital subscribers receive

  • Unlimited access to all stories from nashuatelegraph.com on your computer, tablet or smart phone.
  • Access nashuatelegraph.com, view our digital edition or use our Full Access apps.
  • Get more information at nashuatelegraph.com/fullaccess
Sign up or Login

‘Pledge’ event makes for
bad political theater in NH

The political silly season shifted into high gear this week as evidenced by the dog-and-pony show the state chapter of Americans for Prosperity staged at the Legislative Office Building on Wednesday.

The group staged a ceremonial signing of a pledge to oppose higher spending, taxes and Medicaid expansion and to support right-to-work legislation. The group hailed that 200 or so New Hampshire Republican candidates have already or are about to add their John Hancocks to the manifesto. It’s the brainchild of Tom Thomson, grandson of former Gov. Meldrim Thomson, who originated the New Hampshire famous pledge of opposition to a statewide sales or income tax.

As a statement of principles, the pledge is fine. It no doubt has political value for conservative candidates who can use it as leverage against opponents who choose not to sign it. But contrived and melodramatic media events like these are testaments to the continued trivializing of American political debate.

What was truly laughable, though, was the assertion of gubernatorial candidate Andrew Hemingway that primary rival Walt Havenstein’s support of the pledge wasn’t sincere because he didn’t attend the theatrics, choosing instead to attend a Washington, D.C., fundraiser with U.S. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.

“It tells me these promises aren’t a priority for Mr. Havenstein,” Hemingway said.

No it doesn’t. It means nothing, and to suggest that it does is silly.

There’s a definite chill in the air over Russia and Putin

Nearly 23 years ago, the Soviet Union collapsed, bringing an end to the Cold War. It spawned great optimism that the U.S. and its longtime arch-rival were about to forge a constructive partnership that would usher in a new era of enhanced international stability.

Things seemed to be going pretty well, for a while. Then Vladimir Putin was elected Russian president and relations between the two superpowers have been in nearly constant decline ever since. President Barack Obama attempted to reach out to Putin during his first administration and has been treated with contempt ever since.

The world view gap between Russia and the U.S. and its European Union allies was laid bare by the downing of Malaysian Flight 17. The strike was likely a stupid mistake, but the Russian government’s behavior in its aftermath has been despicable. Not only did it deny involvement, but it has spread outrageous conspiracy theories to poison domestic public opinion.

Even the usually tame EU couldn’t look the other way. This week it approved a series of economic sanctions aimed at restricting Russian access to Europe’s capital markets. At the top of the hit list were several leading Russian banks and individuals considered to be among Putin’s oligarchs.

The ball is in Putin’s court. Welcome to Cold War II.

What to make of the Fenway fire sale at trade deadline

You can’t say Major League Baseball doesn’t have a sense of humor. On Thursday, the non-waiver trade deadline, MLB.com was saturated with advertisements for Penske truck rentals featuring the phrases “You can’t get home unless you move” and “Never stop moving.”

No team sent more big-name players packing this week than the Boston Red Sox, who jettisoned high profile starting pitchers Jon Lester, John Lackey and Jake Peavy, along with outfielder Jonny Gomes, shortstop Stephen Drew and relief pitchers Andrew Miller and Felix Doubront.

With three World Series wins in the 21st century, the Red Sox are the most successful baseball franchise in the past 10 years. But the roller coaster ride of the past three years – worst to first and back to worst – scratches some of the luster off that achievement. Attendance and broadcast ratings are dropping and fans know the 2013 World Series championship was a fluke.

Last season was an unimaginable ride, but the Sox are not the darlings of New England that they once were, largely because of a front office that has lost its way.