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Friday, June 27, 2014

Nashuan’s humility does justice to highest honor

Telegraph Editorial

If you’ve never been in combat, there is no way to know how it truly feels. There is no way to know how you will act until you confront death face to face.

So while we are in awe of the descriptions and simulations of what Nashua native Staff Sgt. Ryan Pitts went through to earn the Medal of Honor while fighting in Afghanistan, we can’t begin to appreciate the full extent of his courage and resolve, nor can we thank him enough. ...

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If you’ve never been in combat, there is no way to know how it truly feels. There is no way to know how you will act until you confront death face to face.

So while we are in awe of the descriptions and simulations of what Nashua native Staff Sgt. Ryan Pitts went through to earn the Medal of Honor while fighting in Afghanistan, we can’t begin to appreciate the full extent of his courage and resolve, nor can we thank him enough.

Pitts, now the ninth living soldier to receive the nation’s highest military honor for combat service in Afghanistan and Iraq, will be honored at a White House ceremony July 21.

Meeting with reporters this week, Pitts was humble in discussing his valor. He chose instead to pay tribute to the fellow soldiers who lost their lives.

“Valor was everywhere,” he said. “This award belongs to every man who was there that day and I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for them. It was an honor of my lifetime to serve with them.”

The term hero is overused, but in this case, Sgt. Pitts is a true hero in deed and words.