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Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Gas prices in N.H. rise by 3.5 cents over the past week, according to survey

If you thought gas prices were going to drop to $3 a gallon as a late Christmas present for commuters, think again.

Average retail gasoline prices in New Hampshire rose 3.5 cents a gallon in the past week, averaging $3.38 a gallon, according to an analysis of 875 gas stations in the state. ...

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If you thought gas prices were going to drop to $3 a gallon as a late Christmas present for commuters, think again.

Average retail gasoline prices in New Hampshire rose 3.5 cents a gallon in the past week, averaging $3.38 a gallon, according to an analysis of 875 gas stations in the state.

The survey, conducted by GasBuddy, a Minnesota-
based organization that tracks gasoline prices in the United States and Canada, shows both good news and bad.

The good news: Gasoline prices in New Hampshire on Sunday are 7.5 cents per gallon lower than a month ago.

Now, the bad news: Prices in New Hampshire were 15.1 cents a gallon higher than the same day a year ago.

Nationwide, gas prices increased an average of 3 cents last week to $3.27 a gallon, according to the gas analysis at www.GasBuddy.com.

The national average has decreased 13.2 cents a gallon in the past month and stands 1.7 cents a gallon higher than this day a year ago, according to the organization.

“2012 was a year that focused the spotlight on our nation’s oil refineries; it showed us the vulnerability of our infrastructure and what can

happen to prices at the pump when
infrastructure is compromised,” said Patrick DeHaan, GasBuddy.com senior petroleum analyst.

“We began the year with a BP refinery fire in Cherry Point, Wash., that caused massive spikes on the West Coast. The spring delivered challenges for Great Lakes refineries and pushed Chicago gas prices to a record high. Similarly, the California summer saw major refinery outages there and new record high prices,” DeHaan said.

“Hurricane Sandy delivered a punishing blow to the East Coast, causing refinery shutdowns, flooding and power outages. The resulting fuel shortage triggered milelong lines for gas. New York gasoline spiked to a price level exceeding Honolulu and Anchorage as the highest in the U.S.,” said Gregg Laskoski, GasBuddy.com senior petroleum analyst.

With elevated prices across much of the country for prolonged periods, 2012 brought the highest average price ever for U.S. consumers: $3.60 a gallon. For a closer look at the GasBuddy Year in Review, visit http://www.scribd.com/GasBuddy or view the document directly: http://www.scribd.com/doc/117521912/GasBuddyYIR.

Patrick Meighan can be reached at 594-6518 or pmeighan@nashuatelegraph.com.