Saturday, November 22, 2014
My Account  | Login
Nashua;40.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/ovc.png;2014-11-22 19:58:26
Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Death penalty opponents to hold vigils outside Addison’s Supreme Court hearings

CONCORD – While lawyers and justices parse complex legal concepts and jargon and a convicted cop killer waits to see if he will be executed, death penalty opponents will be thinking about the big picture later this week and protesting outside the state’s highest court.

The New Hampshire Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty will hold silent vigils outside the New Hampshire Supreme Court before and after hearings on Michael Addison’s trial in the 2006 shooting death of Manchester Police Officer Michael Briggs. ...

Sign up to continue

Print subscriber?    Sign up for Full Access!

Please sign up for as low as 36 cents per day to continue viewing our website.

Digital subscribers receive

  • Unlimited access to all stories from nashuatelegraph.com on your computer, tablet or smart phone.
  • Access nashuatelegraph.com, view our digital edition or use our Full Access apps.
  • Get more information at nashuatelegraph.com/fullaccess
Sign up or Login

CONCORD – While lawyers and justices parse complex legal concepts and jargon and a convicted cop killer waits to see if he will be executed, death penalty opponents will be thinking about the big picture later this week and protesting outside the state’s highest court.

The New Hampshire Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty will hold silent vigils outside the New Hampshire Supreme Court before and after hearings on Michael Addison’s trial in the 2006 shooting death of Manchester Police Officer Michael Briggs.

The hearings, which will be held from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday, could decide whether Addison will become the first person executed in New Hampshire in decades.

The coalition said death penalty opponents, including former law enforcement officers, church leaders and relatives of murder victims, will participate in the vigils from 7:30-9 a.m. and 2:45-4 p.m. at the 1 Charles Doe Drive courthouse.

The hearings have nothing to do with the legality or morality of the death penalty in New Hampshire, but will focus on possible procedural errors made during Addison’s 2008 trial.

The Manchester NAACP said the fact that Addison is black is an unfair, but not unusual, reason he is on death row while other men who have killed police officers are serving life sentences.

“Race has proven to be a factor in death penalty cases,” said Woullard Lett, chairman of the NAACP’s legal redress committee.

“The vigils will reflect the voices of those who are fed up with the death penalty exhausting valuable, yet limited, resources and those who believe executions are contrary to the values our society should hold,” said Selina Taylor, a coalition member.