Tuesday, September 2, 2014
My Account  | Login
Nashua;82.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/few.png;2014-09-02 10:03:00
Friday, November 9, 2012

NH bans gooseberry, currant plants because they carry pine tree disease

Varieties of gooseberry and currant plants that are supposed to be resistant to a disease that affects white pine trees have been banned by the state because they aren’t actually resistant.

The New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands made the announcement Friday, saying, “Effective immediately, there will be no new permits approved for the planting of gooseberries or currants in New Hampshire. ...

Sign up to continue

Print subscriber?    Sign up for Full Access!

Please sign up for as low as 36 cents per day to continue viewing our website.

Digital subscribers receive

  • Unlimited access to all stories from nashuatelegraph.com on your computer, tablet or smart phone.
  • Access nashuatelegraph.com, view our digital edition or use our Full Access apps.
  • Get more information at nashuatelegraph.com/fullaccess
Sign up or Login

Varieties of gooseberry and currant plants that are supposed to be resistant to a disease that affects white pine trees have been banned by the state because they aren’t actually resistant.

The New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands made the announcement Friday, saying, “Effective immediately, there will be no new permits approved for the planting of gooseberries or currants in New Hampshire.

“It has recently been discovered that so-called ‘resistant’ varieties on the approved species list have consistently turned up infected with white pine blister rust throughout New Hampshire. Until further study is complete, there is a moratorium on new plantings.”

The disease is caused by a fungus. It can weaken and even kill white pine trees.

Many plants are prohibited from being planted in New Hampshire because they’re foreign invasive species or because they harbor diseases that can harm native species. Gooseberry and currant plants have been prohibited in New Hampshire for years because of white pine rust, but the state has allowed a few varieties that were supposed to resist the fungus. They can be planted only with written permission of the Division of Forests and Lands.

People who have planted so-called “resistant” varieties in the last 10 years are encouraged to call the forest health office at 464-3016 for more details.

– Telegraph staff