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Thursday, September 4, 2014

EEE found in mule in town of Candia, raising concern

Easter equine encephalitis, or EEE, has been found in a mule in the town Candia, just east of Manchester, leading the state to raise concern as we enter the riskiest time of year for the mosquito-borne disease.

“The end of August through mid-October is the time that people are at the greatest risk for contracting a mosquito-borne disease. It is so important for everyone in the State, no matter where you live, to take simple precautions to prevent being bitten by mosquitoes.” said Public Health Director Dr. José Montero. ...

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Easter equine encephalitis, or EEE, has been found in a mule in the town Candia, just east of Manchester, leading the state to raise concern as we enter the riskiest time of year for the mosquito-borne disease.

“The end of August through mid-October is the time that people are at the greatest risk for contracting a mosquito-borne disease. It is so important for everyone in the State, no matter where you live, to take simple precautions to prevent being bitten by mosquitoes.” said Public Health Director Dr. José Montero.

So far this season New Hampshire’s Public Health Lab has tested 2,908 batches of mosquitoes. Of those, 6 tested positive for EEE and none have tested positive for West Nile Virus, which is a less dangerous disease. Additionally, one person was diagnosed with EEE virus infection in August.

EEE carries a high mortality rate for those who contract the encephalitis form of the illness. Symptoms may include high fever, severe headache, and stiff neck. There is no treatment for the disease, which can lead to seizures and coma.

WNV is less dangerous, although in rare cases it can be fatal.

Symptoms for both diseases are similar, and usually occur 4 to 10 days after being bitten. People experiencing flu-like symptoms, including fever and headache, should contact their doctor.

Officials urge people to: Use an effective mosquito repellent when outside; wear long sleeves and long pants at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active; remove standing water from around your home so mosquitoes do not have a place to breed; and check window screens.

For more information about EEE and West Nile Virus visit the DHHS website at www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/cdcs/arboviral/index.htm or call the Bureau of Infectious Disease Control at 271-4496.

– TELEGRAPH STAFF