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Friday, August 29, 2014

Police seek pit bull that killed another dog during hike near Tuckerman Ravine

PINKHAM NOTCH – New Hampshire State Police are asking for help from the public to help identify a pit bull and its owner, after the dog attacked another dog during a mountain hike near Tuckerman Ravine.

The attacked dog died of its injuries three days later. ...

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PINKHAM NOTCH – New Hampshire State Police are asking for help from the public to help identify a pit bull and its owner, after the dog attacked another dog during a mountain hike near Tuckerman Ravine.

The attacked dog died of its injuries three days later.

Police said the attack happened on Aug. 21. Reports on a Facebook page titled Hiking With Dogs indicate that the victim dog was a poodle.

Police distributed a photo of the pit bull and the owner. They ask anyone with information that may help identify the dog and owner contact Trooper Jonathan Stephens at 223-8873.

Dogs do not have to be on a leash in the White Mountains National Forest but they do have to be under “strict voice control,” said Colleen Mainville, public affairs specialist for WMNF.

“We emphasize that – strict voice control,” she said. “This has been our policy for as long as I can remember.”

Dogs must be on a leash when in campgrounds within the national forest.

The WMNF is overseen by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service. National parks, such as Acadia in Maine or related property including Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, are controlled by the National Park Service, which has different rules.

The Park Service says pets must be on a leash not exceeding 6 feet in length, or caged or crated, while park managers can have stricter limits, such as making certain areas off limits to pets.

As a complication, however, the Appalachian Trail is overseen by the National Park Service. This apparently means dogs must be on a leash when on trails within the White Mountains National Forest that are part of the A.T., but not otherwise.

New Hampshire State Parks rules say that dogs must be on a leash that is no more than 6 feet in length – except for “remote areas,” where they can be off leash as long as nobody else is around.

“Remote area means those areas and trails where and during a time when the dog owner or handler and the dog will not come in contact with other users. The dog owner or handler shall leash the dog when other users are nearby,” according to state rule 7300, titled “Parks and Recreation.”

David Brooks can be reached at 594-6531 or dbrooks@nashua
telegraph.com. Also, follow Brooks on Twitter (@GraniteGeek).