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Friday, June 27, 2014

New Hampshire and its neighbors remain older than rest of the U.S.

Northern New England continues to be the oldest place in the nation, with Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire coming in at 1, 2 and 3 in terms of highest median age in 2013.

The latest update from the Census Bureau is no surprise, and partly reflects race and ethnicity: Non-hispanic white Americans have been having smaller families than many other groups for decades, which skews the population mix toward older people. ...

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Northern New England continues to be the oldest place in the nation, with Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire coming in at 1, 2 and 3 in terms of highest median age in 2013.

The latest update from the Census Bureau is no surprise, and partly reflects race and ethnicity: Non-hispanic white Americans have been having smaller families than many other groups for decades, which skews the population mix toward older people.

Nationally, nearly 79 percent of people over 65 are white, whereas only 51
percent of people under 15 are white.

Northern New England has the highest percentage of non-hispanic whites of any part of the country.

Median age – in which half the population is older and half is younger – was 42.3 years in New Hampshire in 2013, a full year older than it was in the 2010 census.

Maine’s median age of 43.9 was highest in the country; Vermont, at 42.4, was the second-highest.

Massachusetts was No. 12 in terms of median age, at 39.4.

The youngest state was Utah, with its large population of Mormons, who tend to have more children per family: Its median was 30.2 years. But even Utah is aging, as its median has risen one year since 2010.

In fact, the U.S. as a whole continues to get older.

Only Alaska, Hawaii and five states in the Great Plains saw declines in median age between 2010 and 2013 – the Great Plains difference is attributed to the oil and gas boom that has drawn lots of younger workers.