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Nashua;20.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/nskc.png;2014-12-20 07:14:09
Monday, April 8, 2013

Nashua police working on records detailing the disposal, release of out of commission weapons, equipment

NASHUA – Sometimes public information can be released simply with the word “please.”

Last week, The Telegraph sat in on the Nashua Police Commission’s monthly meeting at 0 Panther Drive to see how it operates, who attends its 7:30 a.m. sessions, and to push it to operate more transparently with online records and a later meeting time. ...

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NASHUA – Sometimes public information can be released simply with the word “please.”

Last week, The Telegraph sat in on the Nashua Police Commission’s monthly meeting at 0 Panther Drive to see how it operates, who attends its 7:30 a.m. sessions, and to push it to operate more transparently with online records and a later meeting time.

We joined two other public citizens – both former Nashua police officers – sitting around a table with Nashua Police Chief John Seusing, Deputy Chiefs Scott Howe and Andrew Lavoie, and the three-person commission for a session spanning roughly 90 minutes.

Tony Pivero, a retired officer, arrived with his agenda: to get his police badge and plaque that he says Nashua officers receive upon retirement, but Pivero never received. Pivero also raised questions about the $400 sidearm the department gives away to the retiring officer who used it – though Pivero says he wants “nothing to do” with the gun he had.

“Who pays for that?” Pivero asked Seusing, referring to the city-owned sidearm the department gives to its retiring officers. “Under what city ordinance, or I guess guideline or law, is the Nashua Police Department entitled to give away city property?”

The Nashua Police Department, with a fiscal 2013 budget of more than $17 million, got approval to spend $82,000 on ammunition and firearm supplies, $4,000 on miscellaneous supplies, $10,000 on operational supplies, $10,000 on crime scene/evidence supplies, and $48,000 on protective clothing this year.

In January, aldermen approved the department’s purchase of 154,000 rounds of .40-caliber Smith & Wesson ammunition, 4,000 rounds of .308-caliber rifle ammunition, 10,000 rounds of .223-caliber semi-automatic rifle ammunition, and 31,500 rounds of 5.56x45-caliber ammunition and 22 bullet-proof vests over the remaining fiscal 2013 budget year.

With that in mind, we wondered where the rest of the department’s hundreds and thousands of dollars worth of equipment goes when it is considered out of commission?

Last week, The Telegraph asked Seusing for documentation, retention schedules, and the disposal and/or sales practices for the firearms and equipment that the department can no longer use.

We didn’t even need to file a Right-to-Know request for the information. Seusing said the Nashua Police Department’s administrative department is working on our request.

– MARYALICE GILL