Nashua CTE teacher nationally recognized

NASHUA – Jeffrey Leone’s Video Production and Broadcasting class at Nashua High School South is “excellent.”

At least, it is according to Advance CTE, a national Career Technical Education organization, which recently named the program the winner of the 2018 Excellence in Action Award in the Arts, A/V Technology & Communications Career Cluster.

According to Leone, who worked in the broadcast industry for 12 years and has been teaching in Nashua for seven, receiving the national recognition is “humbling.”

The application process included a number of questions, including information on how the course is run, certifications it might offer, diversity in the program, work-based learning, graduation rates and more. The application was then reviewed by state CTE directors from across the country.

Leone will be recognized in an official ceremony in Washington, D.C., this April. He also will receive an official banner to hang, as well as “digital signage,” which can be attached to emails and the website.

His classes, Video Production and Broadcasting I and II, teach basic competency standards like camera, audio, lighting and editing skills. It also goes over the three phases of production, how to meet deadlines, teamwork and how to produce television programs.

Students create public service announcements, safety ads for corporate businesses and even a community service project for seniors. The point, Leone said, is to show them the real-life application of their skills. Because of this, he concentrates not on a teacher-student relationship, but more of a boss-employee one, which he said he thinks pays off.

Plus, Doug Beals, paraeducator, “is a great team partner,” and having him in the class allows him to focus on lesson plans and instruction, he said.

But the real secret to the success of the program, and this new award, is the “passion the students have for what we teach,” Leone said.

“I love doing this. I loved being part of the broadcast industry and sharing that passion and the stories I have with the students.”

Hannah LaClaire can be reached at 594-1243 or hlaclaire@nashuatelegraph.com