N.H. bridges ‘structurally deficient’

State estimates needed repairs to cost approximately $7.5 billion

The American Road & Transportation Builders Association recently completed the National Bridge Inventory reports for each state, and New Hampshire ranked low based on the percentage of structurally deficient bridges.

According to its report, bridge data was sourced from the 2017 National Bridge Inventory ASCII files, released by the Federal Highway Administration on Jan. 18.

New Hampshire ranked 40th, based on the number of structurally deficient bridges.

According to their report, “Of the 2,479 bridges in the state, 270, or 10.8 percent, are classified as structurally deficient. This means one of the key elements is in poor or worse condition.”

It also was highlighted in that report that 232 new bridges have been constructed in New Hampshire over the past decade. Over those 10 years, 164 bridges have undergone major reconstruction.

In the report, it listed 25 of the top most traveled structurally deficient bridges in New Hampshire, and eight of those are in Hillsborough County. One of those bridges was the NH-101 span over Osgood Road in Milford. It was built in 1977, and is an urban/other principal arterial bridge that see’s a vehivle count of 18,000 per day.

In Nashua, the Canal Street Bridge over the Nashua River was listed as one of the top-most-traveled structurally deficient bridges in New Hampshire. It was built in 1928, and is an urban/other principal arterial type of bridge that see’s 17,000 daily crossings.

According to their report, “The state has identified needed repairs on 2,433 bridges; which the state estimates will cost $7.5 billion.”

Adam Urquhart can be reached at 594-1206 or aurquhart@nashuatelegraph.com.