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Wednesday, January 2, 2013

To make or break: Some New Year’s resolutions are bound to fail, others easier to keep

What’s in a resolution? For some people, not much.

A number of Hudson residents said Monday afternoon that they had no plans of making a New Year’s resolution after ringing in 2013. For some, it was because they knew they wouldn’t keep it. For one Hudson resident, it was because he’s completely content. ...

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What’s in a resolution? For some people, not much.

A number of Hudson residents said Monday afternoon that they had no plans of making a New Year’s resolution after ringing in 2013. For some, it was because they knew they wouldn’t keep it. For one Hudson resident, it was because he’s completely content.

Bill Neault said he has no reason to make a resolution because everything is where it should be in his life.

He added that others make them because they have things they want to change.

“Things are pretty good. I’m healthy, I guess that’s the main thing, being healthy. My daughter just had a baby the other day and she’s healthy. It’s all good,” he said. “I live in the bright side.”

Rita Boucher, of Hudson, said she will make a couple of New Year’s resolutions this year. The one she’s most likely to break?

Her diet.

“Because I love food,” she explained.

The resolution Boucher plans on keeping is seeing more of her daughter, who lives in California, along with her grandchildren. She had her 3-year-old grandson, Brayden Patch, with her on New Year’s Eve.

“I take care of my two grandchildren, and I plan to get out there more,” she said about California.

Brayden’s New Year’s resolution was to go to Disney World again. He just got back from Florida, where he celebrated his birthday.

“He’s done it for three years now. This is the first year he realized what it was,” Boucher said.

Even though he didn’t know it, Brayden’s other New Year’s resolution is to continue to help with his 6-month-old sister.

“He’s a very, very good big brother. He takes very good care of his sister,” Boucher said.

Hudson resident Carolyn Sassak said she doesn’t make New Year’s resolutions, but instead has a birthday resolution every year.

“It’s always the same stuff, try to be a better person, lose weight, try to look more beautiful, try to get rid of wrinkles,” she said, laughing.

Sassak said it’s hard for people to keep their New Year’s resolutions because “they set themselves up.”

“It’s always the things you’ll fail at,” she said. “(People have) a lack of will power.”

Sassak’s daughter, Kellsey Sassak, said she had a New Year’s resolution, but figured she would break it. Kellsey, who attends Nashua Community College, said she needs to study harder and get her act together.

“I’ve tried since second grade to do better in school, and it hasn’t worked out. I’m ... moderate, like Bs,” she said. “If I tried harder, I would probably get better grades.”

On the other side of the coin, Alvirne High School senior Jasson Mendoza kept his last year’s resolution, keeping up with his homework.

He said it paid off. He hadn’t originally planned on making an additional New Year’s resolution this year but decided to extend his already successful one from 2012.

“(I’ll) keep my grades up and go to college,” Mendoza said. “It’s a new year, so why not?”

Erin Place can be reached at 594-6589 or eplace@nashuatelegraph.com. Also, follow Place on Twitter (@Telegraph_ ErinP).