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Nashua;40.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/novc.png;2014-10-31 00:50:39
Monday, December 31, 2012

Nashua area digs out from Freyr; Greenville tops state totals at 10.1 inches

That the latest winter storm, dubbed Freyr by The Weather Channel, visited the area in the middle of a weekend and during a favorite vacation period led to a more leisurely cleanup and fewer than normal accidents and other incidents often associated with significant snowfalls.

Police dispatchers in the region had little to report in the way of accidents, save for a few fender-benders and spinouts typical of the storm’s first couple of hours. Flakes began falling in Nashua around 4 p.m. Saturday, and by 9 p.m., snowfall was moderate with some blowing but little drifting. ...

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That the latest winter storm, dubbed Freyr by The Weather Channel, visited the area in the middle of a weekend and during a favorite vacation period led to a more leisurely cleanup and fewer than normal accidents and other incidents often associated with significant snowfalls.

Police dispatchers in the region had little to report in the way of accidents, save for a few fender-benders and spinouts typical of the storm’s first couple of hours. Flakes began falling in Nashua around 4 p.m. Saturday, and by 9 p.m., snowfall was moderate with some blowing but little drifting.

As far as snow totals went, TWC reported Sunday morning that the Monadnock Region town of Greenville appeared to be the state’s jackpot, with 10.1 inches on the ground when all was said and done.

Most interesting, however, was the report out of Downeast Maine: Southwest Harbor, known as Acadia’s “quiet side,” was buried in 17.5 inches of snow, a total the island rarely sees throughout a winter.

Southwest Harbor’s total also is the highest reported in all 16 Midwest and Northeast states that Freyr affected, TWC reported. Second was Terra Alta, W.Va., which received 16 inches. Finzel, Md. recorded 14 inches, while Burrillville, R.I., totaled 13 inches.

Rounding out New England, South Burlington, Vt., reported 10.2 inches; Milford, Mass., got 12.7 and Higganum, Conn., received 12.3 inches.

In the Nashua area, highways, turnpikes and main roads were mostly all clear of snow and ice by noontime Sunday. Most secondary roads were still covered with snow, but most all were plowed and passable. Officials urged motorists to be alert for slippery spots on all roads.

TWC’s new winter-storm naming venture, meanwhile, is rooted in its goal of making storms easier to remember and to refer to into the future. “Attaching a name makes it much easier to follow a weather system’s progress,” according to www.weather.com.

“A storm with a name takes on a personality all its own,” making it much easier to reference particular storms, especially in today’s social media world, the site states.

It defines Freyr (rhymes with flare) as a Norse god associated with, among other things, fair weather. The next named storm of 2012-13 will be Gandolf, followed by Helen, Iago, Jove and Khan.