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Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Hudson man, former IRS agent sentenced to house arrest for tax fraud

BOSTON – A Hudson, N.H., resident and former IRS agent was sentenced to house arrest, probation and fines at a hearing in U.S. District Court on Tuesday.

In February, Michael Doyle, 44, was found guilty of defrauding the government by lying about when he bought his home on forms that qualified him for a first-time homebuyer’s tax credit, according to Carmen Ortiz, U.S. attorney for Massachusetts.

Doyle, a 20-year IRS employee and supervisor, was sentenced to six months of home confinement and three years of probation and ordered to pay $9,500 in fines and restitution, according to Ortiz.

Doyle had been a supervisor in the IRS’ Small Business and Self-Employed Division, according to court records.

The jury found that Doyle submitted a phony form claiming he bought a home in Hudson in time to qualify for a $7,500 tax credit that was part of the federal stimulus package, according to the indictment.

To qualify for the credit, first-time homebuyers had to make the purchase between April 8, 2008, and June 30, 2009.

Doyle bought his house on or about Aug. 15, 2007, but between Feb. 12 and March 2, 2009, Doyle submitted a 1040 tax return that falsely claimed he purchased the home on April 15, 2008, according to the indictment.

Doyle was one of 14 people indicted around the same time on similar charges, according to Ortiz.

The charge carried a possible sentence of five years in prison, three years of supervised release and a $250,000 fine, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. Doyle remained employed by the IRS at the time his arrest was announced.

IRS employees annually receive ethics training, the indictment said.

Ethics training includes “admonitions that they must fully comply with all tax laws and submit accurate tax returns in a timely manner,” the indictment said.

The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Fred Wyshak Jr., of the U.S. attorney’s Public Corruption Unit, according to Ortiz.

Joseph G. Cote can be reached at 594-6415 or jcote@nashuatelegraph.com.