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  • Staff photo by Bob Hammerstrom


    Brandon Byrd, left, is interviewed by Steven Hooper as they record a radio program Tuesday, March 27, 2012, in a small room set up as an internet radio station at the Nashua Community College.
  • Staff photo by Bob Hammerstrom


    From left, Ian Howes, Brandon Byrd, Cameron Kelloway, and Steven Hooper share a laugh before recording a radio program Tuesday, March 27, 2012, in a small room set up as an internet radio station at the Nashua Community College.
  • Staff photo by Bob Hammerstrom


    Cameron Kelloway, right, interviews fellow student Brandon Byrd as they record a radio program Tuesday, March 27, 2012, in a small room set up as an internet radio station at the Nashua Community College.
  • Staff photo by Bob Hammerstrom


    Ian Howes, left, and fellow student Brandon Byrd record a radio program Tuesday, March 27, 2012, in a small room set up as an internet radio station at the Nashua Community College.
Thursday, March 29, 2012

Nashua Community College students making waves with Internet radio

Cameron Kittle

Tucked away in a small, second-floor room at Nashua Community College, three local students broadcast free music, information and interviews out to the world.

Ian Howes, Steven Hooper and Cameron Kelloway started WNCC, Nashua Community College Radio, a year ago in March and quickly developed the organization into a 24/7 online operation.

The Internet radio station plays college announcements, music from local bands, upcoming events, and interviews with several community and campus figures. Hooper talked with college President Lucille Jordan last year and Howes did an interview in the fall with Tim Geromini, director of business development for Nashua’s collegiate baseball team, the Silver Knights.

Anyone can tune into the radio station, at www.nashuacc.edu/online-eservices/wncc-radio. The station is always streaming, although only a limited number of broadcasts are live.

Howes, 20, of Hudson, said the goal is to create a radio station that brings the campus community together and spreads the word about interesting events in Nashua.

“It’s been a learning experience for me,” he said. “We’re trying to do something new. We’re developing the organization as we go along. We’ve taken it from an idea on a piece of paper to what you see here in just over a year.”

What you see in Room 214 of the college are two microphones, some radio equipment and a computer. But that’s all it takes to record and broadcast over the Internet, sending information out to anyone willing to listen.

Still, the on-campus reception has been slow, Howes said.

“Not everyone knows we’re here,” he said. “We’re trying to expand that. We’re trying to get the word out.”

With three active members and about 12 volunteers who come and go, the organization needs to grow to survive.

Hooper, 21, a graduate of Nashua High School North, is leaving in May with a degree in liberal arts.

WNCC Radio has posted organizational meetings on posters throughout the campus building, and Howes is often updating the group’s social media accounts: Nashua Community College Radio on Facebook and @Radio_NCC on Twitter.

“There are so many choices for media, sometimes it’s hard to be heard,” Hooper said. “But this doesn’t feel like a chore, it feels like we’re doing something creative. I feel privileged to have the opportunity to speak to anybody in the world who wants to listen. The reach is unbelievable.”

Magnus Pardoe, a tech support employee at the college, said it can be tough to build something from scratch, but there’s a definite interest from students at the college. Pardoe volunteered to be the organization’s adviser after he worked in college radio as a student at Rivier College many years ago.

“Part of the trouble with commuting schools is building that sense of community,” Pardoe said. “This (radio station) will be another facet of that.”

Hooper said it would be great to do some fundraising and buy mobile equipment, so that the radio station can go “on the road” and broadcast from the gymnasium during basketball or volleyball games.

“There’s a community for the sports teams here,” he said.

Howes, Hooper and Kelloway welcome all ideas from their fellow students. They hope some awareness of the organization will help bring in students with creative ideas to put on the radio.

There’s really no limit, as long as it’s clean and professional, Howes said.

“We want people to come in and make their own shows,” Hooper said. “There’s no technology barrier; the software is real easy to learn. Anybody’s who is a student can come in. Don’t be shy. This is anybody’s station.”

The Learning Curve appears Thursdays in The Telegraph. Cameron Kittle can be reached at 594-6523 or ckittle@nashuatelegraph.com. Also check out Kittle (@Telegraph_CamK) on Twitter.