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  • Staff photo by Don Himsel


    Facebook Don Himsel at The Telegraph


    A home on Back River Road in Merrimack Monday, October 31, 2011with a large oak tree down on wires.
  • Staff photo by Don Himsel


    Facebook Don Himsel at The Telegraph


    Hillcrest Road in Litchfield is closed Tuesday, November 1 near the intersection of the Charles Bancroft Highway because of this tangled mess of trees and utility lines.
Tuesday, November 1, 2011

PSNH: 135,000 customers still without power

Step by step, inch by inch.

On Monday, 73 percent of PSNH customers in Nashua remained without power. As of Tuesday morning, that was reduced to 66.48 percent, or 26,609 of 40,028 customers.

While more than 86 percent of Hudson customers remained in the dark, that was down from the 92 percent Monday. Merrimack had dropped from 88 to 73 percent of customers without power.

In Greater Nashua, Hollis had the highest percentage of PSNH customers without power, more than 95 percent of customers in town.

PSNH says about 135,000 customers are still without power around New Hampshire as of 6 a.m.

That is down from a peak of 237,000 without power on Sunday afternoon.

The company is setting up two temporary area work centers in Amherst and in Hudson to handle of a growing workforce.

The company said the savings in travel and dispatch times will speed up the restoration effort in the southern portion of the state, which was significantly impacted by the weather event.

About 150 additional two-man line crews are arriving to assist the 153 PSNH and support crews already at work. The newest crews include workers from Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Missouri and Tennessee. In addition to line workers, about 130 tree trimming crews will be working Tuesday to continue the task of clearing trees, limbs and branches from wires and infrastructure.

PSNH said that Monday’s efforts focused on critical community infrastructure like schools and municipal buildings. Schools that are without power will be the target of continued attention on Tuesday.

Downed trees still litter many towns, and clearing roads remains a high priority in the southern tier of the state.

Patrick Meighan can be reached at 594-6518 or pmeighan@nashuatelegraph.com.