Wednesday, August 20, 2014
My Account  | Login
Nashua;81.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/sct.png;2014-08-20 16:26:25
Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Bachmann gains in NH’s GOP presidential poll

A Suffolk University/7NEWS poll of likely voters in New Hampshire’s GOP presidential primary revealed Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., has climbed 8 points since May and now maintains 11 percent of likely Republican primary voters’ support in the Granite State.

Bachmann, who has the second most support among candidates, has gained more points than any other candidate since Suffolk last polled likely New Hampshire voters in May.

Bachmann announced that she represents tea party ideals during her official presidential campaign announcement in Iowa on Monday. The Suffolk poll showed 51 percent of respondents also identified themselves as aligned with tea party principles, and 54 percent described themselves as conservative.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who commanded 36 percent of the support, climbed 1 point since Suffolk University’s last New Hampshire poll was released almost two months ago.

With the exception of Romney and Bachmann, support for the 18 candidates tested remained in single digits. Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty slipped 3 points, to 2 percent, since May, while former Speaker Newt Gingrich did not change from his 2 percent support.

Texas congressman Ron Paul has remained steady with 8 percent of the support since May; he is third overall and ahead of Sarah Palin (4 percent) and Rudy Giuliani (5 percent).

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman gained 4 points (4 percent), placing him ahead of Gingrich, Pawlenty and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, who had 1 percent support.

Suffolk University, in downtown Boston, conducted the statewide survey of 400 likely voters in New Hampshire’s Republican presidential primary from June 25-27, using live telephone interviews. Suffolk determined the margin of error was plus or minus 4.9 percent with a 95 percent level of confidence.

For more information, visit www.suffolk.edu/research/1450.html.

– MARYALICE GILL