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  • Staff photo by Don Himsel


    Quinn Glover answers "yes sir" while testifying in Hillsborough County Superior Court in Nashua, New Hampshire Wednesday, March 16, 2011. Christopher Gribble is on trial for his role in the 2009 murder in Mont Vernon New Hampshire of Kimberly Cates and injury of her young daughter Jaimie. (AP Photo/POOL/Don Himsel)
  • Staff photo by Don Himsel


    Autumn Savoy, a friend of Christopher Gribble and who is in prison for his role in the Mont Vernon crime in 2009, shows how Christopher Gribble showed him a machete used in the attack on Kimberly and Jaimie Cates while testifying in Hillsborough County Superior Court in Nashua, New Hampshire Thursday, March 17, 2011. Christopher Gribble is on trial for his role in the 2009 murder in Mont Vernon New Hampshire of Kimberly Cates and injury of her young daughter Jaimie. (AP Photo/POOL/Don Himsel)
  • Staff photo by Don Himsel

    William Marks used his fifth amendment right on the stand Tuesday morning March 15, 2011. Christopher Gribble is on trail for his role in the 2009 murder in Mont Vernon New Hampshire of Kimberly Cates and injury of her young daughter Jaimie.
Thursday, March 31, 2011

Sentencings set Monday for Mont Vernon killers’ co-defendants

NASHUA – The two young men who murdered Kimberly Cates have started serving their life sentences in prison, and their accomplices are due to join them soon.

Sentencing hearings have been scheduled at 1:30 p.m. Monday for the other two young men from Amherst who were also armed and broke into the house but did not take part in the attack. They later testified against Steven Spader, 19, and Christopher Gribble, 21, both formerly of Brookline.

Quinn Glover, 19, pleaded guilty to charges of burglary, robbery and conspiracy to robbery, and is expected to be sentenced to 20 to 40 years in prison, while William Marks, 19, is expected to plead guilty to conspiracy to murder and burglary and criminal liability to first-degree assault and is expected to be sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison.

The sentencing hearing for Autumn Savoy, 21, of Hollis has yet to be scheduled. Savoy wasn’t involved with the October 2009 home invasion at 4 Trow Road, Mont Vernon, but admitted to helping his friends hide evidence and giving them a false alibi after the fact.

Savoy, formerly of Hollis, pleaded guilty to two counts of hindering apprehension and one of conspiracy to hindering apprehension, and is expected to be sentenced to five to 12 years in prison.

Glover, Marks and Savoy each testified against Spader; while Glover and Savoy also testified against Gribble.

All of them have been jailed since their arrests but will serve their sentences in one of the state’s two prisons for men in Concord and Berlin. Spader and Gribble are in Concord, prison records show.

Prison officials routinely try to keep inmates involved in the same crime separated by using the two prisons and different wings to keep them isolated from each other. In some cases, or when necessary, inmates have been moved out of state. Even with those options, keeping inmates separated can be a challenge, said prison spokesperson Jeff Lyons.

“It’s a juggling act, quite frankly,” he said.

Gribble and Spader are in the Concord Prison for Men’s maximum-security unit, spending 23 hours a day in their cells and will remain there for at least the first few years of their life sentences.

The pair are housed on different tiers of the unit along with 89 other inmates and have zero contact with each other.

Spader and Gribble could be moved to a different unit, or a lower-security facility, depending on their behavior over the next 2-4 years, Lyons said.

“It depends on how they behave, how they respond,” he said. “There are some people who have never left the maximum security unit because they continue to have behavior issues.”

About 70 of the residents of the unit are maximum-security inmates.

The wing also is used to house inmates under protective custody and those who are being disciplined for violating prison rules, Lyons said.

Where the rest of the Mont Vernon co-defendants – Marks, Glover and Savoy – end up is still up in the air.

First, each will be housed in the Concord prison’s Reception and Diagnostic Unit for about a month where they will undergo a number of health, mental health and intelligence assessments so officials can determine where they should be housed and in which programs they should participate.

“It’s hard to say what’s going to happen with them,” Lyons said. “We have to look at the impact on the safety of the institution, the safety of the inmate and the safety of the other inmates in the prison.”

They could end up in either New Hampshire prison, or shipped out of state through compact agreements the Department of Corrections has with counterparts throughout the country, Lyons said.

“We really won’t know until the others get here,” he said. “There’s lots of possibilities. I think it’ll all be figured out as time goes on.”

Andrew Wolfe can be reached at 594-6410 or awolfe@nashuatelegraph.com. Joseph G. Cote can be reached at 594-6415 or jcote@nashuatelegraph.com.