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  • Correspondent photo by Bruce Preston

    Brookline Police Chief Bill Quigley III speaks with Officer Robert Pelletier on Oct. 27, the chief’s second day on the job. Quigley says that the patrol officers are the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the department and he looks forward to developing an environment of community policing within the town.
  • Correspondent photo by Bruce Preston

    Brookline Police Chief Bill Quigley III, right, gets familiar with the emergency equipment kept in the town’s police cars with the help of Officer Robert Pelletier on Tuesday, October 27, the Chief’s second day on the job. Quigley says that the patrol officers are the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the department and he looks forward to developing an environment of community policing within the town.

  • Correspondent photo by Bruce Preston

    Brookline Police Chief Bill Quigley III, right, gets familiar with the emergency equipment kept in the town’s police cars with the help of Officer Robert Pelletier on Tuesday, October 27, the Chief’s second day on the job. Quigley says that the patrol officers are the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the department and he looks forward to developing an environment of community policing within the town.

  • Correspondent photo by Bruce Preston

    Brookline Police Chief Bill Quigley III started his position on Monday, October 26th. Quigley says that the patrol officers are the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the department and he looks forward to developing an environment of community policing within the town.

Saturday, October 30, 2010

Brookline swears in new police chief

BROOKLINE – William Quigley III, the town’s new police chief, brings 34 years of experience in New Hampshire law enforcement to Brookline after he was sworn in Monday evening before the Board of Selectmen met.

Quigley said he believes the role of every police department, no matter its size, is “to provide the best service possible.”

To achieve that goal, Quigley said, he’s stressing community policing and a management philosophy that “maintains unity in the community.”

“I’ve spoken with Sgt. (Michael) Kurland, who established the Neighborhood Watch program, and I think it’s an outstanding idea, a way to give the citizens of Brookline a little bit of ownership,” Quigley said. “A police department can’t function without the cooperation of the community.”

Asked how he would deal with a department unsettled by the firing of its chief in April and the uncertainty of a long search for a replacement, Quigley said he’s focused on the present and future.

“This is a new endeavor for myself,” he said. “I’m in a position where everything in this police department is new to me, and I’m new to everyone. We have to get to know each other.”

Quigley said he looks forward to getting acquainted with officers and determining their strengths to “capitalize on the specialities of each officer.”

Central to his philosophy is the belief that the relationship between the police department and the community is key, Quigley said.

“My angle here is being proactive, not reactive,” Quigley said, “to bring police officers into the community and to have citizens feel comfortable, regardless of the reason.”

Town officials had anticipated that Quigley would start his new job on Monday, but a holdup at the Local Government Center, the agency charged with making the final background check, meant the new chief had to wait a day.

The LGC had informed the town that it would complete and send its report by the end of the workday on Monday, but officials realized late in the day that the paperwork hadn’t been forwarded, possibly because of a faulty fax number, Selectman Clarence Farwell said.

The Board of Selectmen announced about two weeks ago that it intended to appoint Quigley as police chief as soon as a background check was completed.

Quigley, who lives in Brookline and began his career in 1976 as a police officer in Hollis, starts his new job under a three-year contract.

He was a member of the Hollis Police Department until 1979, leaving Hollis to join the State Police, where he served for 24 years. He left the State Police in 2003 to become deputy police chief in Weare, a position he held until 2008.

Most recently, Quigley served as state coordinator for the New Hampshire Drug Education and Classification Program. He was appointed after a three-month search process that began at the end of June after the Board of Selectmen chose a seven-member search committee.

The chief’s position became open after the board fired former Police Chief Thomas Goulden in April, without giving a reason.

After Goulden’s firing, the board appointed Kurland as interim chief.

Hattie Bernstein can be reached at 673-3100, ext. 24, or hbernstein@cabinet.com.