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  • Staff photo by Bob Hammerstrom

    Thomas Stanley, left, and his father, Cornelius appeared in Hillsborough County Superior Court Friday, February 19, 2010, for their arraignments and bail hearings on charges stemming from alleged paving scams.
  • Staff photo by Bob Hammerstrom

    Thomas Stanley, left, and his father, Cornelius appeared in Hillsborough County Superior Court Friday, February 19, 2010, for their arraignments and bail hearings on charges stemming from alleged paving scams.
Thursday, September 23, 2010

Stanleys at it again in Ohio

NASHUA – Although he is prohibited from paving so much as a pothole in New Hampshire, it didn’t take long for Cornelius V. Stanley to turn up elsewhere with “extra” asphalt.

Stanley, 47, of 32 Yarmouth Drive, and one of his sons, Cornelius V. Stanley Jr., 27, of Virginia, were chastised and chased off by a building department official earlier this month after they allegedly tried to pull their paving scam on the owner of a mobile home park in Bedford Heights, Ohio, near Cleveland, according to the park’s owner and published reports.

Hidden Cove Ltd. owner Kristy Apel contacted law enforcement and the Better Business Bureau on Sept. 1, after the Stanleys, doing business as Safeway Paving, tried to collect $14,000 for a paving patch job they had said would cost $275.

The Stanleys were not charged and they left empty-handed after a city building official confronted them and found they lacked the required permits to work in the area, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reported.

A Hillsborough County Superior Court order bars Cornelius V. Stanley Sr. and two younger sons from paving in New Hampshire, and a prosecutor said Stanley risks prison if he’s arrested for anything, anywhere in the next five years.

The Greater Cleveland Better Business Bureau issued a warning about the Stanleys and paving scams on Sept. 13, noting their prior convictions in New Hampshire.

“The Stanleys admitted they did not have the required permit to do the work and provided an address for Safeway Paving, which turned out to be a Mexican restaurant. Their vehicle had Massachusetts license plates,” the Better Business Bureau said.

Cornelius V. Stanley Sr. and two of his sons, Joseph C. Stanley, 20, of Nashua, and Thomas Stanley, 21, of Kingston, all were convicted earlier this year on theft charges stemming from a series of paving scams in southern New Hampshire.

A judge sentenced Joseph Stanley to five to 10 years in prison and ordered him to pay more than $30,000 in restitution. Cornelius and Thomas Stanley each got suspended, one-year prison sentence. Each was also fined and ordered to pay $250 restitution for a single scam at a local auto repair shop.

All three Stanleys were barred from paving in the state for the next five years, by court order. The state court order has no authority outside New Hampshire.

The Stanleys are part of a large, extended family, many of whom have made their living in asphalt for generations, all over the United States. Some Stanleys run reputable paving companies, while others focus on fly-by-night paving, using mobile phones and unlicensed businesses with no permanent headquarters. The transient pavers solicit paving jobs door to door, often claiming to have leftover materials, and try to extort hefty fees for cut-rate work. The elderly and small-business owners are favored targets.

The Ohio incident was the first report of Cornelius Stanley turning up elsewhere since his conviction in Nashua, Tracy Culberson, New Hampshire senior assistant attorney general, said Wednesday. It was “not entirely unexpected,” Culberson said.

“There are challenges in prosecuting people who commit these types of crimes and travel throughout the country to do it,” Culberson said.

While New Hampshire courts and law enforcement have no jurisdiction beyond the Granite State, the terms of Stanley’s suspended sentence require that he remain on good behavior, and some or all of it could be imposed if Stanley runs afoul of the law elsewhere in the next five years, Culberson said.

“The sentence that we imposed really gives him an opportunity to get his act together,” Culberson said, adding later, “If he does get arrested for anything, and I find out about it, I’m going to file a motion (to impose the sentence).”

Andrew Wolfe can be reached at 759-2808 or by e-mail at awolfe@nashuatelegraph.com