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Nashua-BoireFieldAirport;49.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/skc.png;2017-02-23 11:05:52
Monday, February 13, 2017

Storm impact lingers into Monday morning, midday 

By DEAN SHALHOUP
Staff Writer

NASHUA - Barely had Greater Nashua residents made their driveways and walkways passable again when Mother Nature tapped them on their collective shoulders and said, "excuse me, but I'm not finished yet."

And indeed she wasn't, having sprinkled a two or three-inch appetizer Saturday morning before coming back Sunday afternoon and Monday with a main course that means business. ...

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NASHUA - Barely had Greater Nashua residents made their driveways and walkways passable again when Mother Nature tapped them on their collective shoulders and said, "excuse me, but I'm not finished yet."

And indeed she wasn't, having sprinkled a two or three-inch appetizer Saturday morning before coming back Sunday afternoon and Monday with a main course that means business.

While some forecasters on their accumulation maps put the region on the cusp of the 18-24 inch band, Hudson meteorologist Doug Webster said Sunday evening that he expects to see between 10 and 15 inches on the ground by the time things wind down Monday morning.

"It will snow hard at times, but it won't be continuous," Webster said, comparing this event with Thursday's storm, which featured an extended period of heavy snowfall.

Regardless, enough snow has fallen, and will fall early Monday, to have a significant impact on almost everything.

In preparation, state Homeland Security officials activated its Emergency Operations Center at 4 p.m. Sunday, and all school districts had, or planned to, call off school for Monday.

Most government offices, including libraries, announced Monday closings, as did many businesses.

In Nashua, a snow emergency is in effect until 6 p.m. Monday, having been instituted Sunday night, according to city Emergency Director Justin Kates. That means no parking on city streets or in municipal lots, the exception being the Elm and High street parking garages, where parking is free for the duration of the snow emergency.

The overnight parking program is suspended as well.

Kates reminded residents that any cars left on the streets or in lots will be towed to the Four Hills Landfill. The good news is owners can pick up their vehicles at any time during the snow emergency; the bad news is the fine is $315.

Nashua District Court and Hillsborough County Superior Court South will be closed Monday.

Nashua Transit will delay the start of service Monday until 9 a.m.

Nashua Public Library will also have a delayed opening; go to www.nashualibrary.org for exact time.

There will be no trash and recycling collection on Monday. Routes will therefore be delayed one day for the rest of the week. The landfill will be open Monday, Kates said.

He asks that residents not put out their trash or recycling on Monday, but do so Tuesday morning before 6:45 a.m.

Any updates or additional information will be posted on the city's Website, www.nashuanh.gov, throughout Monday.

Gov. Chris Sununu held a storm-related press conference in Concord Sunday evening, reiterating local and state officials' recommendations and safety warnings.

He said he took part Sunday in a conference call with state and local emergency management officials to exchange information and share any updates.

State government will remain open, Sununu said, but employees are urged to telecommute if possible.

The state legislature, however, has cancelled all Monday sessions, according to Jim Rivers, Statehouse communications director.

All legislative offices will also be closed on Monday.

Officials said power outages are possible during the storm, especially when winds are strongest. Residents are reminded to stay away from downed power lines, and report any outages to their local power company.

Neither Eversource or Unitil, the state's major electric suppliers, reported any outages as of Sunday night.

Meanwhile, Webster, who is also The Telegraph's weather columnist, said wind, as it did in Thursday's storm, will play a role in this storm, albeit a slightly different one.

On Thursday, for instance, it was already pretty windy by afternoon, and its velocity increased as the night wore on. This time, Webster said, it appears wind won't be a major factor until after the snow stops falling, which he predicts to be around 8 or 9 a.m.

That is expected to set the stage for a windy Monday, with enough blowing and drifting to make it seem like it's snowing again.

The reason is a rapid intensifying of the storm as it moves away, a situation that forecasters say could dump up to two feet of windblown snow on Midcoast and Downeast Maine.

Another difference is it's warmer today than it was Thursday, meaning that this round of snow will be a little heavier due to a higher moisture content.

Looking ahead, Webster said he and his fellow forecasters are keeping an eye on a system that may bring another round of snow or wintry mix come Wednesday.

But so far, at least, there's nothing to indicate it will come close to this storm in terms of accumulation or dangerous conditions.

Dean Shalhoup can be reached at 594-1256, dshalhoup@nashuatelegraph.com or@Telegraph_DeanS.