Friday, December 9, 2016
My Account  | Login
Nashua-BoireFieldAirport;31.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/nskc.png;2016-12-09 02:37:18
Thursday, December 1, 2016

Dozens seek aid with new Safe Stations

By DAMIEN FISHER
Staff Writer

NASHUA - Close to 30 people have sought treatment for opioid addictions in the first 10 days of Nashua's Safe Stations program.

Mayor Jim Donchess said 13 people have gone directly to one of the city's fire stations for help, though many more have called to ask about entering treatment. He said, including those 13 individuals, an estimated 27 or 28 people have entered into treatment through the program since it launched earlier this month. ...

Sign up to continue

Print subscriber?    Sign up for Full Access!

Please sign up for as low as 36 cents per day to continue viewing our website.

Digital subscribers receive

  • Unlimited access to all stories from nashuatelegraph.com on your computer, tablet or smart phone.
  • Access nashuatelegraph.com, view our digital edition or use our Full Access apps.
  • Get more information at nashuatelegraph.com/fullaccess
Sign up or Login

NASHUA - Close to 30 people have sought treatment for opioid addictions in the first 10 days of Nashua's Safe Stations program.

Mayor Jim Donchess said 13 people have gone directly to one of the city's fire stations for help, though many more have called to ask about entering treatment. He said, including those 13 individuals, an estimated 27 or 28 people have entered into treatment through the program since it launched earlier this month.

Nashua's Safe Stations program is modeled on the effort started earlier this year in Manchester. It allows people suffering from an opioid addiction to go to any fire station in the city and get help. In Manchester, more than 700 people have been helped through the program.

Donchess said this week that the city's cost for operating Safe Stations may be about $20,000 for the remainder of the fiscal year, which ends on June 30.

"We're still developing that information," Donchess said.

Nashua is joining with the Partnership For Successful Living, a collaborative of nonprofits including Harbor Homes and Keystone Hall. As part of the Safe Stations program, Nashua will pay the transportation costs to bring people from a fire station to a Harbor Homes facility.

Under the plan, a person who seeks help at a fire station will be immediately checked out by EMTs with Nashua's ambulance service, American Medical Response, then connected with intake professionals with Harbor Homes.

The Harbor Homes professionals will then bring the person to one of two locations - the Harbor Homes facility on High Street or the Maple Avenue shelter. Once there, the person will be given medical detox while the Harbor Homes staff finds placement in an appropriate treatment facility.

Donchess plans to present the Board of Aldermen with a funding proposal for Safe Stations in the coming weeks.

Damien Fisher can be reached at 594-1245 or dfisher@nashuatelegraph.com.