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Sunday, November 27, 2016

YMCA of Greater Nashua’s summer reading program a success

Submitted to The Telegraph

The YMCA's Summer Learning Loss Prevention Program has had two successful summers of improving literacy skills for children in low income communities. As one of the pilot programs in 2015 (and one of 29 states participating in this Y initiative last summer), the organization has seen, firsthand, the importance of keeping children engaged in reading during the summer, and the benefits it has on their school year academics and social interactions.

According to Elizabeth Covino, the Y's director of community relations, "Literacy has been a huge focus for the YMCA. National studies show that children in third grade who are reading below grade level are more susceptible to dropping out of high school, which will likely lead to lower wage jobs, a higher propensity for substance abuse, incarceration, and lower self-esteem. The Y is helping to combat illiteracy with our Summer Learning Loss Prevention Program which is currently based in the Ledge Street School. For six weeks this summer, 32 low-income first- and second-graders with deficiencies in reading participated in an intensive literacy program which used the Y's national evidence-based curriculum to promote success and enrichment both in the classroom and beyond. ...

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The YMCA's Summer Learning Loss Prevention Program has had two successful summers of improving literacy skills for children in low income communities. As one of the pilot programs in 2015 (and one of 29 states participating in this Y initiative last summer), the organization has seen, firsthand, the importance of keeping children engaged in reading during the summer, and the benefits it has on their school year academics and social interactions.

According to Elizabeth Covino, the Y's director of community relations, "Literacy has been a huge focus for the YMCA. National studies show that children in third grade who are reading below grade level are more susceptible to dropping out of high school, which will likely lead to lower wage jobs, a higher propensity for substance abuse, incarceration, and lower self-esteem. The Y is helping to combat illiteracy with our Summer Learning Loss Prevention Program which is currently based in the Ledge Street School. For six weeks this summer, 32 low-income first- and second-graders with deficiencies in reading participated in an intensive literacy program which used the Y's national evidence-based curriculum to promote success and enrichment both in the classroom and beyond.

"At the Y, statistics from the post-assessment of the program showed that 95 percent of the kids in the program increased their percentile rank on the STAR Assessment (used to evaluate students' abilities and identify what they've already mastered and where they still struggle). Our first-graders gained more than a full year of reading progress in the six weeks of the program and our second-graders gained two months of reading progress instead of losing the average two and a half months to the standard 'the summer learning loss,'" Covino continued.

The Summer Learning Loss Prevention Program at the YMCA of Greater Nashua has had two successful summers of improving literacy skills for children in low-income communities.

As one of the pilot programs in 2015, and one of 29 states participating in this Y initiative last summer, the Y has seen firsthand the importance of keeping children engaged in reading during the summer and the benefits it has on their school year academics and social interactions.

Literacy has been a huge focus for the YMCA. National studies show that children in third grade who are reading below grade level are more susceptible to dropping out of high school, which will likely lead to lower-wage jobs, a higher propensity for substance abuse, incarceration and lower self-esteem.

Donate to the YMCA of Greater Nashua at www.nmymca.org.