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Monday, August 11, 2014

Former Dr Crisp student to be its interim principal this fall

When Rose Francoeur takes the helm at Dr. Crisp Elementary School as the interim principal, she won’t need to be shown around: She went to the school.

“I just love this school, I’m happy to come through the door every single day,” said Francoeur. ...

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When Rose Francoeur takes the helm at Dr. Crisp Elementary School as the interim principal, she won’t need to be shown around: She went to the school.

“I just love this school, I’m happy to come through the door every single day,” said Francoeur.

Francoeur first went through the door when Dr. Crisp first opened, attending fifth and sixth grades there.

She has been part of the Nashua School District for four years as an assistant principal, splitting time as an assistant principal for Dr Crisp and New Searles Elementary for one year. During her most recent year, she shared her time between Dr Crisp and the Curriculum Office where she developed units for elementary accelerated math.

She replaces Jane Quigley, who retired.

The biggest difference for her this year, she said, will be the shift in responsibility. The role of assistant principal is to support the principal, while the principal is the “true institutional leader” of the building, she said.

“(The school) is very important to me. We just have a phenomenal staff. The biggest thing I’m excited for is to see what we can do together for the children,” she said.

“For staff, students and families ... really bringing out the importance that it’s all connected. For learning to take place, there has to be this communication and understanding—everyone on the same page. When that happens, students really get involved themselves, they’re more in charge of their learning experience,” Francouer said.

The school will continue to host family and community events on campus, but will try to venture out into the community more often.

“We’re still planning ... but we’ve talked about us going out into the community for storytelling...and more of the ‘bike to school’ program as well,” said Francoeur.

“I’m really devoted to this school, I went to it the first year it opened for fifth and sixth grade. The school has a special place in my heart. Sometimes I’ll talk to the children and they’ll get a kick out of it, that I went to this school, I lived in this neighborhood. It was significant enough for me to come back,” she said.

She recalled one teacher in particular from her time as a Dr Crisp student. “Ronald Meuse; he definitely made a huge difference. He was a catalyst in my life,” she said.

“I feel like I can make a difference every day, it’s all I really want out of life. When you walk through classrooms and you see the learning taking place, and you ask them what they’re learning...you see that ‘aha’ moment...that’s the joy you get out of it,” she said.

Tina Forbes can be reached at 594-6402 or tforbes@nashuatelegraph.com. Also, follow Forbes on Twitter (@Telegraph_TinaF).