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Saturday, August 9, 2014

Millyard building in Nashua slated for partial demolition, work on fast track

NASHUA – Another piece of Nashua’s historic Millyard will soon have a new look after city officials gave the go-ahead to demolish a piece of the long, skinny building at 3 Pine St. to make way for the Broad Street Parkway.

The northern section of the building, known as Storehouse No. 2, will be torn down within 45 days. The area previously housed the former Faith Baptist Church, which relocated to Hudson and changed its name when it became clear the building would be impacted by the parkway project. ...

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NASHUA – Another piece of Nashua’s historic Millyard will soon have a new look after city officials gave the go-ahead to demolish a piece of the long, skinny building at 3 Pine St. to make way for the Broad Street Parkway.

The northern section of the building, known as Storehouse No. 2, will be torn down within 45 days. The area previously housed the former Faith Baptist Church, which relocated to Hudson and changed its name when it became clear the building would be impacted by the parkway project.

Members of the aldermanic Finance Committee on Wednesday approved a $347,400 contract with D.L. King & Associates for demolition and a partial renovation of the building, which will be outfitted with a new entrance, new windows and a staircase.

The committee also approved adding $43,000 to an existing contract for design work with Dennis Mires, PA The Architects, an eight-person architectural firm based in Manchester.

The brick building was constructed in the 19th century, and is believed to be the site of one of Nashua’s earliest rail depots. It was used previously as a warehouse. It underwent a series of expansions, and the section slated for demolition was the last piece to be added to the structure. The roughly 100-foot section is aligned at an angle near the corner of Pine and Ledge streets.

Plans drafted in 2010 called for about one third of the building to be demolished, but the project was scaled back after historic preservationists took an interest in the structure, according to parkway project manager John Vancor.

The city acquired the rights to build on the property from Forrence Millhouse LLC, which also owns Gate City Fence.

Vancor said the city hopes to move quickly on the project because it must be completed in order to begin work on the southern leg of the 1.8-mile parkway, which will travel through the Millyard.

“Everybody wants this done as quick as possible,” he said.

Work is underway now on the northern section of the parkway, which includes building new bridges on Baldwin Street and Fairmount Street and a crossing over the Nashua River. The city is preparing to issue a request for bids for the remaining contract for work in the Millyard area.

“We’re eager to get it advertised, and we’re simply waiting for the final approval from (the New Hampshire Department of Transportation) and federal highway to advertise it,” Vancor said.

The Broad Street Parkway is scheduled to open in August 2015. The latest projections put the cost of the project at close to $64.4 million. The limited-access, two-lane road will link Broad Street near Exit 6 of the F.E. Everett Turnpike with downtown.

Jim Haddadin can be reached at 594-6589 or jhaddadin@nashuatelegraph.com. Also, follow Haddadin on Twitter (@Telegraph_JimH).