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Nashua;30.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/skc.png;2014-12-19 18:24:50
Monday, August 4, 2014

Don Himsel's Voices: 'It’s peaceful up here.'

Don Himsel

Al Shaw said he always knew he’d make it to the states, but he figured it would be Idaho.

Shaw, from Paisley, Scotland, was working in his Greeley Park garden. Deep among the green leaves and bright blossoms, he worked around his vegetables. ...

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Al Shaw said he always knew he’d make it to the states, but he figured it would be Idaho.

Shaw, from Paisley, Scotland, was working in his Greeley Park garden. Deep among the green leaves and bright blossoms, he worked around his vegetables.

He wore a bandana with a pink and red lips motif around his head, looking like a collection of kisses. He had two chairs around an umbrella and table to give him a spot of shade.

Shaw is a long-time user of the community space. “At least 20 years,” he said.

He talks proudly about his garden – prolific and compact, like the spaces in Scotland.

‘Honestly it’s like another home,” he tells me about his daily visits to nurture his vegetables. “It’s peaceful up here. You’ve got the green, grow your veggies, sunflowers… it’s very relaxing,” said Shaw.

He remarked about the “wide open spaces” here in the United States.

There’s a bit of Scottish lilt in his voice as he talks about his boyhood introduction to farming. His father had him collect sheep dung for fertilizer.

It wasn’t intensive work, he admits, but he attributes that simple act being around the garden as providing a foundation for his adult endeavors in his small Nashua plot.

Shaw gives a tour. “Peas didn’t do well this year,” he said. “We’ve got lots of tomatoes, eggplant, cucumbers. They’re all in there someplace.”

It’s his summer routine. “What I like to do is get up here about 7:30. I stop at Dunkin’ Donuts, get my coffee and a donut. I work for about two, two and a half hours, and then leave it,” he tells me.

He raves about the park and all it has to offer.

“Good camaraderie with people around,” he said, adding as he looks around, “It’s nice to see things grow.”

Don Himsel can be reached at 594-6590 or DHimsel@nashua
telegraph.com. Also, follow Don on Twitter @Telegraph
_DonH.