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Saturday, July 26, 2014

Nashua real estate, development icon Nash dies at 90

Prominent local business owner Gerald Q. Nash has died, family members announced Friday.

Nash was a born businessman who as a child sold popcorn balls to WPA workers for a nickle apiece, worked his way up to co-owner of a thriving Nashua manufacturing concern, then teamed up with an acquaintance to form one of the most powerful, and successful, real estate sales and development partnerships of the 20th century. ...

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Prominent local business owner Gerald Q. Nash has died, family members announced Friday.

Nash was a born businessman who as a child sold popcorn balls to WPA workers for a nickle apiece, worked his way up to co-owner of a thriving Nashua manufacturing concern, then teamed up with an acquaintance to form one of the most powerful, and successful, real estate sales and development partnerships of the 20th century.

Nash died about 5:30 p.m. Friday at the Community Hospice House in Merrimack, just one day after entering the facility. He was 90.

He leaves his wife, Lucille, three daughters and two sons. He was predeceased by a third son in 1977.

Bob Clegg, a son-in-law, said Nash went to work
every day up until May, when a fall at home reduced his mobility. He lived at the family compound on Trigate Road in Hudson until he entered hospice on Thursday, Clegg said.

Nash was a young man when he took over his father’s box factory on Water Street. In the late 1960s, he sold it to his brother and joined the late Samuel Tamposi Sr., who he met playing cards in Boston, and thereby launched one of the best-known real estate and development duos from New England to Florida.

Sale and lease signs reading “Nash-Tamposi” or “Tamposi and Nash” sprouted in Nashua and beyond as the duo snapped up land and developed buildings on speculation – taking a risk, but not one they couldn’t cover.

“We weren’t afraid to own a building,” Nash told a Concord Monitor reporter in 2000. “We didn’t bet anything that we couldn’t back up.”

Nash often repeated the philosophy his father instilled in him when he was making 25 cents an hour working for his father at the box shop.

“He was a businessman from the old school,” Nash said of his father. “His word was his bond. You did the right thing. You kept the truth.”

Funeral arrangements are incomplete. An obituary will appear in The Telegraph in the near future.

Dean Shalhoup can be reached at 594-6443 or dshalhoup@nashuatelegraph.com.