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Thursday, July 17, 2014

Resolution reached in suit against Nashua Historical Society

NASHUA – Ten months of legal wrangling over how the Nashua Historical Society board of directors ousted former society President Terry Romano has been “amicably resolved,” according to a statement issued by both sides Monday.

According to the resolution, which was reached through a state Supreme Court mediation session, the society will award Romano the title of past president emeritus through 2016 “in recognition of her many years of service.” ...

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NASHUA – Ten months of legal wrangling over how the Nashua Historical Society board of directors ousted former society President Terry Romano has been “amicably resolved,” according to a statement issued by both sides Monday.

According to the resolution, which was reached through a state Supreme Court mediation session, the society will award Romano the title of past president emeritus through 2016 “in recognition of her many years of service.”

In turn, the group’s current president, Joanne Ouellette, said the society “welcomes Ms. Romano’s continued support of the society and the Ce Ce Romano Memorial Scholarship Fund,” which was created in memory of Romano’s late sister.

Romano said in the statement that she “looks forward to assisting the membership and … continuing my support of the society.”

Ouellette, who was named president in May, taking over for interim President Cecile Renzi, said the terms of the agreement are confidential and she could not comment further.

Romano was one of the 18 plaintiffs listed in the lawsuit, which was filed by attorney Francis Murphy on their behalf in the wake of her dismissal. The society’s board voted in April 2013 to oust Romano after relations between her and the board and society staff deteriorated.

The suit claimed the president could only be removed by a two-thirds vote of the entire membership, which was never conducted.

The plaintiffs asked the court to order Romano reinstated as president and that she be allowed to complete her term.

According to court documents, the Supreme Court received the case May 1, after the plaintiffs appealed a lower court decision in April and agreed to “appellate mediation.”

The decision no doubt comes as a relief to both sides, especially as the society gets set for Thursday night’s opening reception for its newest exhibit, “Settling the Lands of Old Dunstable: Farms and Agriculture in the Early Days of Nashua,” which starts at 7 p.m. in the Speare Museum, 5 Abbott St.

Dean Shalhoup can be reached at 594-6443 or dshalhoup@nashuatelegraph.com. Also, follow Shalhoup on Twitter (@Telegraph_DeanS).