Friday, August 1, 2014
My Account  | Login
Nashua;73.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/nsct.png;2014-08-01 20:22:23
Thursday, July 10, 2014

Storm took down “attractive nuisance” 60-foot swing in Mont Vernon

MONT VERNON – A bolt of lightning or some really strong wind knocked down the biggest swing in the region during last week’s storms, but that may not have been entirely a bad thing.

“We loved it; we’re very sad for our swing,” said Ana Barrett of the almost 60-foot-tall swing that hung from a giant ash tree on their property, halfway up the long Mont Vernon hill as it rises from Milford. “You thought you were going to land on the farm down below, when you got going up high.” ...

Sign up to continue

Print subscriber?    Sign up for Full Access!

Please sign up for as low as 36 cents per day to continue viewing our website.

Digital subscribers receive

  • Unlimited access to all stories from nashuatelegraph.com on your computer, tablet or smart phone.
  • Access nashuatelegraph.com, view our digital edition or use our Full Access apps.
  • Get more information at nashuatelegraph.com/fullaccess
Sign up or Login

MONT VERNON – A bolt of lightning or some really strong wind knocked down the biggest swing in the region during last week’s storms, but that may not have been entirely a bad thing.

“We loved it; we’re very sad for our swing,” said Ana Barrett of the almost 60-foot-tall swing that hung from a giant ash tree on their property, halfway up the long Mont Vernon hill as it rises from Milford. “You thought you were going to land on the farm down below, when you got going up high.”

“I got to swing really high on it – we used to see the Pomeroy’s house,” said Julia, 5, one of three young daughters in the Barrett home, referring to the dairy farm at the base of their property.

The swing was installed a year ago by Brookline resident Bob Eaton, a retired arborist whom Jim and Ana Barrett had met through church. He installed it without a cherry picker or ladder, using a slingshot to get a throw line over the branch, then climbing the tree to install the necessary tree bolts and hardware.

The resulting swing was unusual, perhaps unique in the region and drew lots of attention. At first that was fine.

“We’ve let everybody who stopped and ask swing on it, as long as they park in the driveway. People have had their wedding pictures taken out there,” said Barrett.

But increasingly, she said, people had been using the swing without asking. It is easily visible from busy Route 13, and the Barretts were getting concerned that it had become what lawyers call an “attractive nuisance,” and they would be at fault if somebody was injured.

“We were worried that somebody was going to be hurt, and there would be liability,” she said.

Right before the storm hit, in fact, they were asking advice from friends about how best to discourage people from parking on busy Route 13 and walking across their field to try the swing.

“Maybe this was Mother Nature’s way of preventing us from having a problem – that was my husband’s take on it,” she said.

The family salvaged the swing and hopes to reinstall it on a tree closer to the house, one less likely to attract passers-by. But in the meantime, they’re missing their friend.

“I’m sad,” said Grace, 4.

David Brooks can be reached at 594-6531 or by email at
dbrooks@nashuatelegraph.com. Also, follow Brooks on Twitter (@GraniteGeek).