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Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Hollis gas pipeline meeting moved to Middle School, anticipating big crowds

HOLLIS – A public hearing to discuss possible alternate routes for a natural gas pipeline in the area has been shifted to the Hollis Brookline Middle School because large crowds are anticipated.

It will start at 7 p.m. on Monday, July 14, in the multi-purpose room at the school, 25 Main St. ...

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HOLLIS – A public hearing to discuss possible alternate routes for a natural gas pipeline in the area has been shifted to the Hollis Brookline Middle School because large crowds are anticipated.

It will start at 7 p.m. on Monday, July 14, in the multi-purpose room at the school, 25 Main St.

A presentation of alternative routes in Town Hall on Monday filled the selectmen’s meeting room to overflowing, even though no public comment was allowed.

Monday’s meeting will be designed to gather public comment and opinions, and will almost certainly draw more people.

The routes were put together by an engineering firm hired by Beaver Brook Association, the Hollis-based environmental group.

The route put forward by Kinder-Morgan, parent company of Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co., would have run through a number of Beaver Brook properties that are covered by conservation easements, which forbid development projects like pipelines.

Any pipeline must be approved by a number of federal and state regulatory agencies and is unlikely to be built for at least a year, if at all.

Kinder-Morgan wants to build a large transmission line across northern Massachusetts to meet a shortage of the fuel in New England. It has proposed a distribution lines from Pepperell to west Nashua, running through Hollis.

Two of Beaver Brook’s three alternatives ran through Brookline, which drew the ire of some speakers at a presentation in Brookline.

– TELEGRAPH STAFF