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Monday, June 9, 2014

Bishop Guertin High School graduates encouraged to make the world a better place

NASHUA – Members of the Bishop Guertin High School Class of 2014 were encouraged to make their mark on the world and change it to be a better place during the school’s graduation ceremony Sunday.

Principal Linda Brodeur, who is preparing to become president of the school in July, used her final commencement address to encourage graduates to think about how they can help the next generation, which includes her newborn grandchild. ...

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NASHUA – Members of the Bishop Guertin High School Class of 2014 were encouraged to make their mark on the world and change it to be a better place during the school’s graduation ceremony Sunday.

Principal Linda Brodeur, who is preparing to become president of the school in July, used her final commencement address to encourage graduates to think about how they can help the next generation, which includes her newborn grandchild.

Brodeur paraphrased the poem “The Dash” by Linda Ellis, pointing out that the actions one takes in life are represented on gravestones as a dash – the dash between the date of birth and date of death.

“What makes our lives important and our time here worthwhile is what good we have done to fill in that dash,” she said. “When it is your time to leave this earth, I hope you have lived so that you are proud of the things that are represented in that line.”

Bishop Guertin held its 48th Commencement Sunday inside the Roedel Field House. President Mark Hilton handed diplomas to 198 graduates of the private Catholic school as their names were read before a crowd of hundreds of family members and friends.

Brett Seeley-Hacker, of Windham, served as mistress of ceremonies for the event, which brought together graduates beneath a sea of green and yellow banners inside the gymnasium.

Graduates, faculty and staff entered from the cafe and took their seats on the floor during a procession accompanied by the Bishop Guertin concert band. Campus minister Ken Calabria offered an invocation, followed by remarks from salutatorian Theodore Boivin, of Nashua.

Boivin said graduates had been looking forward to Sunday’s ceremony for four years because it was a day that marked the culmination of their hard work – from preparing for advance placement exams to honing their writing schools and attending gym class. But he encouraged them to remember all they would leave behind, including their time together coming of age, and the new ideas they were exposed to through academics.

“People will say that college will be the most important four years of your life,” he said. “Presumptuous as I may sound, I disagree. College is the shaping of young men and women into better young men and women, but it is high school that sets us on that path, bringing us out of childhood into our new adulthood.”

Boivin encouraged his peers not to take for granted the many faces they came to know at the school, ranging from best friends to lunchmates, classmates and teammates.

“These are the people who made us who we are today – our friends, our fellows, our peers, our teachers, our guides, our mentors,” he said. “And if we took them for granted during these past four years, we know today that every one of us is thinking of those people – dwelling on those memories, those shared experiences. Cherish them.”

Valedictorian Anjithaa Radakrishnan, of Nashua, recalled the lessons each of her teachers imparted over the years, from valuing the contributions of Theodore Roosevelt to history to learning to dance the tango.

In addition to learning subject matter, Radakrishnan said Bishop Guertin’s faculty and staff helped students learn life skills, such as time management and critical thinking.

“At BG, we’ve been known, valued and treasured, constructing a strong foundation that will carry us through the rest of our lives,” she said.