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Friday, May 30, 2014

Nashua Sculpture Symposium winding down to Saturday closing celebration

NASHUA – The guest sculptors in town for this year’s Nashua International Sculpture Symposium have spent the last few days putting the finishing touches on their respective creations, and barring unforeseen complications, all three works will be in place for Saturday’s dedication and closing celebration.

The event, scheduled to start at 1 p.m. on the south side of City Hall, will bring to a close the seventh annual symposium and give organizers and the entire community an opportunity to thank the artists for their contributions. ...

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NASHUA – The guest sculptors in town for this year’s Nashua International Sculpture Symposium have spent the last few days putting the finishing touches on their respective creations, and barring unforeseen complications, all three works will be in place for Saturday’s dedication and closing celebration.

The event, scheduled to start at 1 p.m. on the south side of City Hall, will bring to a close the seventh annual symposium and give organizers and the entire community an opportunity to thank the artists for their contributions.

Kathy Hersh, president of City Arts Nashua and chairwoman of the Symposium Committee, said plans were finalized Thursday afternoon to install the sculptures on Friday. City crews will be assisting at the sites, which include a spot nest to City Hall; Mine Falls Park off North Seventh Street; and Front Street, between the Greeley House and Cotton Mill Square.

Saturday’s festivities begin at the City Hall site, then move to Mine Falls and Front Street, Hersh said. Attendees can either drive or take one of several Nashua Transit trolleys made available for the occasion.

On Thursday, one of the artists, Lasha Khidasheli, of the Republic of Georgia, inspected his work and tweaked a few things here and there while waiting for an epoxy to dry. He said the tall sculpture carved in granite is pretty much done.

“My work is done, now we need to get it there,” he said of its future site, which will be announced Saturday.

Khidasheli and fellow sculptors Kim Sunjin, of Korea, and Mongolia’s Amagalan Tsevegmid enjoyed Thursday’s pleasant weather as they worked outdoors at Ultima Nimco in the city’s historic Millyard.

Symposium volunteer Dottie Silber, who has hosted a couple of the sculptors at her Nashua home during the symposium, visited the work site Thursday to watch the masters at work.

“I’ll miss them,” she said, adding that she’s looking forward to Saturday’s events but not to bidding the visitors adieu.

Also on site was Mandakh Tsevegmid, who said she arrived in Nashua on Wednesday to join her husband and will stay through Saturday’s celebration.

Wielding a tablet, Mandakh Tsevegmid took a series of photos of her husband at work. While the quality isn’t as good as it would be with a regular camera, she said, the tablet is more convenient.

“It makes it much easier to send (photos) to family,” she said of relatives back in Mongolia. “You just (click) and there it goes.”

Meanwhile, Kim Sunjin, who goes by Sun, used a power tool for some delicate detail work on her creation, which Silber said will become a large granite bench when completed and assembled.

Wearing a protective suit and head gear that covered most of her face, Kim finally took a few minutes’ break, but was back at work on the next phase – glazing – in short order.

Organizers said Kim was “specifically pursued” as a 2014 symposium participant because she hails from the Seoul suburb of Ansung, also spelled Anesong, which happens to be Nashua’s “sister city.” The two communities were united about two decades ago by a man named Kyong Chung, who immigrated to Nashua from what was then Ansung County in 1973.

Chung, who died at 85 in 2001, organized delegations in Nashua and Ansung that traveled to each other’s communities. Eventually, a student exchange program also was organized.

“We wanted to honor Mr. Chung with an artist from that area,” Hersh said of the successful effort to recruit Kim.

Dean Shalhoup can be reached at 594-6443 or dshalhoup@nashuatelegraph.com. Also follow Shalhoup on Twitter (@Telegraph_DeanS).