Tuesday, September 30, 2014
My Account  | Login
Nashua;58.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/ovc.png;2014-09-30 13:45:29
Saturday, April 19, 2014

BAE Systems tries using ultraviolet (not infrared) spectrum to spot incoming missiles

NASHUA – Detecting incoming missiles with electromagnetic waves from one part of the spectrum – the ultraviolet – as well waves from the other end of the spectrum – the infrared – is providing BAE Systems with a business opportunity.

“Our enhanced UV (ultraviolet) work is showing that this has a continued growth potential. There’s much to be found in the UV spectrum,” said Steve Johnson, director of business development for the threat management solutions area at BAE Systems in Nashua. ...

Sign up to continue

Print subscriber?    Sign up for Full Access!

Please sign up for as low as 36 cents per day to continue viewing our website.

Digital subscribers receive

  • Unlimited access to all stories from nashuatelegraph.com on your computer, tablet or smart phone.
  • Access nashuatelegraph.com, view our digital edition or use our Full Access apps.
  • Get more information at nashuatelegraph.com/fullaccess
Sign up or Login

NASHUA – Detecting incoming missiles with electromagnetic waves from one part of the spectrum – the ultraviolet – as well waves from the other end of the spectrum – the infrared – is providing BAE Systems with a business opportunity.

“Our enhanced UV (ultraviolet) work is showing that this has a continued growth potential. There’s much to be found in the UV spectrum,” said Steve Johnson, director of business development for the threat management solutions area at BAE Systems in Nashua.

Detection of missiles or other incoming threats to aircraft commonly uses the infrared spectrum, which has longer wavelengths than can be detected by our eyes, because it is released by hot sources such as engines.

BAE’s Enhanced Ultraviolet Threat Warning Sensor uses the ultraviolet
spectrum, which has shorter wavelengths than visible light – but exactly how is unclear, due to security concerns

“That’s part of what we can’t talk about,” Johnson said in response to questions.

He said the sensor is roughly 3 or 4 pounds and can be held in one hand.

“This leverages some technology improvements, makes modifications to some subsystems,” he said.

“This is a R&D program with the Army. It’s looking how it wants to improve its current sensors,” he said. “We’re using ultraviolet to detect IR (infrared)-guided missiles and hostile fire.”

BAE said its Enhanced Ultraviolet Threat Warning Sensor allows threats to be detected “at longer ranges in harsher conditions” and can “ better distinguish from clutter, quickly and accurately locating threats for heightened countermeasure effectiveness.”

The UV project is being done as part of one of the Electronic Systems division’s major contracts, the Common Missile Warning System.

That warning system recently passed an important step in the complicated process of military contracts, a critical design review, for its Integrated Aircraft Survivability Equipment software update.

The overall warning system is slated to be rolled out in 2017 or 2018.

David Brooks can be reached at 594-6531 or dbrooks@nashuatelegraph.com. Also, follow Brooks on Twitter (@GraniteGeek).