Tuesday, September 16, 2014
My Account  | Login
Nashua;55.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/ovc.png;2014-09-16 13:25:35
Tuesday, October 29, 2013

‘Potential political candidate’ and former U.S. Senator Scott Brown talks with Nashua Rotary

NASHUA – Republican Scott Brown didn’t drop any new hints about his political future during an appearance in New Hampshire on Monday, but that didn’t prevent members of the Nashua Rotary Club from reading between the lines.

During a speaking engagement at the Nashua Country Club, the former Massachusetts senator was asked whether his name will be on the ballot again anytime soon. ...

Sign up to continue

Print subscriber?    Sign up for Full Access!

Please sign up for as low as 36 cents per day to continue viewing our website.

Digital subscribers receive

  • Unlimited access to all stories from nashuatelegraph.com on your computer, tablet or smart phone.
  • Access nashuatelegraph.com, view our digital edition or use our Full Access apps.
  • Get more information at nashuatelegraph.com/fullaccess
Sign up or Login

NASHUA – Republican Scott Brown didn’t drop any new hints about his political future during an appearance in New Hampshire on Monday, but that didn’t prevent members of the Nashua Rotary Club from reading between the lines.

During a speaking engagement at the Nashua Country Club, the former Massachusetts senator was asked whether his name will be on the ballot again anytime soon.

“I don’t think I’m done,” he replied. “I think things will take care of themselves one way or the other, but we’ll see.”

Speculation has swirled around whether Brown intends to run for office in the Granite State, where he has made numerous appearances since losing his U.S. Senate seat in Massachusetts last year.

Brown registered a new political action committee in New Hampshire this month, sparking renewed interest in whether he is positioning himself to challenge Democrat Jeanne Shaheen in 2014 or launch a presidential campaign.

Brown, who was billed by the Rotary Club as a “potential political candidate,” didn’t foreclose either of those options Monday.

“I’m ninth generation from New Hampshire,” he said, explaining that his grandparents and great-grandparents are buried in a cemetery in Portsmouth, and his mother, sister, aunts, uncles and nieces still live here.

However, Brown insisted his recent activity in the state is not merely a precursor to a run for office. He said he hopes to foster bipartisanship and quell infighting in the Republican party.

“I’ll be honest with you. This really isn’t about me right now,” he said. “It’s about trying to kind of challenge and stimulate people to get out of their comfort zones and move forward.”

Brown has participated in dozens of speaking engagements this year, visiting at least 23 states by his count.

During a visit to the Iowa State Fair, Brown told the Boston Herald that he is “curious” about the 2016 presidential race, further fueling speculation about a presidential run.

At the same time, Brown has refused to rule out the possibility of challenging Shaheen, a Democrat who is up for re-election next year.

Speaking to a crowd of reporters in Nashua in April, Brown said he is likely to return to politics. Brown has returned to the Gate City three times since then.

He visited the Crowne Plaza Hotel in May and shared the story of his hardscrabble upbringing during a fundraiser for the Childhood Advocacy Centers of Hillsborough County. He was also the keynote speaker at the Nashua Lions Club’s 90th birthday celebration in September before returning to Nashua this week.

Brown also has been retooling his funding apparatus, converting his 2012 campaign committee into a political action committee called The People’s Seat.

The PAC controls the money left over from Brown’s failed 2012 Senate campaign.

It reported having a little more than $187,000 cash on hand as of Sept. 30, according to its latest filing with the Federal Election Commission.

On Oct. 11, Brown also established a political action committee in New Hampshire.

As first reported by the Concord Monitor, the PAC’s goals are to back “strong, dedicated candidates” and continue efforts to “bring reform to government.”

Brown was asked by a reporter to explain his intentions for the new committee after Monday’s speech in Nashua.

“The reason I have it is to obviously support candidates, as I said I would do, not only here, but throughout the rest of the country,” he said.

During his remarks to the Rotary Club, Brown bemoaned the loss of moderate candidates, saying that politicians like himself and former Maine Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe – known for her ability to reach across the aisle – helped bridge party differences.

He said the recent government shutdown is another example of what happens when moderates in both parties are replaced by those with extreme views.

“There are good people down there, Democrats and Republicans,” Brown said. “There are, but things have changed since I, and others, are not there anymore.”

Jim Haddadin can be reached at 594-6589 or jhaddadin@nashuatelegraph.com. Also, follow Haddadin on Twitter (@Telegraph_JimH).