Thursday, August 28, 2014
My Account  | Login
Nashua;69.0;http://forecast.weather.gov/images/wtf/small/few.png;2014-08-28 09:02:48
Saturday, June 29, 2013

University System of NH board votes to freeze in-state tuition for two years

DURHAM – New Hampshire students attending one of the four institutions of the University System of New Hampshire won’t pay more for tuition for the next two years, but will still see a higher sticker price for college.

The USNH board of trustees voted unanimously Friday to freeze tuition for in-state students for two years, one day after the state community college system announced its tuition rates for all students would remain stable next year. ...

Sign up to continue

Print subscriber?    Sign up for Full Access!

Please sign up for as low as 36 cents per day to continue viewing our website.

Digital subscribers receive

  • Unlimited access to all stories from nashuatelegraph.com on your computer, tablet or smart phone.
  • Access nashuatelegraph.com, view our digital edition or use our Full Access apps.
  • Get more information at nashuatelegraph.com/fullaccess
Sign up or Login

DURHAM – New Hampshire students attending one of the four institutions of the University System of New Hampshire won’t pay more for tuition for the next two years, but will still see a higher sticker price for college.

The USNH board of trustees voted unanimously Friday to freeze tuition for in-state students for two years, one day after the state community college system announced its tuition rates for all students would remain stable next year.

However, fees for room and board and other services are expected to rise.

The vote marks the first time in 25 years the board has voted to freeze in-state tuition. The last two years, in-state tuition rose by 9 and 6 percent.

“We are grateful for Gov. Maggie Hassan’s early and strong support for public higher education in the Granite State,” said Richard Galway, chairman of the USNH board. “There is more work to be done, but this major step toward restoration is in the right direction.”

Galway also thanked leaders in the House and Senate for their work on a state budget, approved earlier this week, that comes close to restoring the historic cuts made to the state aid for the University System in 2011.

The Legislature restored funding for the system to $69 million in the first year of the new biennium and $84 million in the second. In September, the University System asked the Legislature to restore state funding to $100 million by the second year, pledging to freeze in-state tuition if that occurred.

But while the new state budget doesn’t quite meet that mark, trustees approved a motion made by Hassan at the board of trustees meeting Friday to enact the tuition freeze.

“With the budget process now complete and funds for the University System substantially restored, freezing tuition for over 22,000 New Hampshire students will make a real difference for families and help us build a stronger workforce that will attract innovative companies,” Hassan said in a statement Friday.

The freeze means in-state students at UNH will pay $13,670 in tuition each year for a full-time class load. Students at Plymouth State University and Keene State College will pay $10,410 annually. Granite State College in-state students will continue to pay $285 per undergraduate credit.

The freeze doesn’t affect fees or room and board, however, and in February –
after approving tuition increases for out-of-state students – the board of trustees said all students would be paying more in that area: 2.2 percent more at Keene State and 2.9 percent more at UNH and Plymouth.

As long as the increases do not change, fall sticker prices for in-state students will be $26,552 at UNH, $21,868 at Plymouth and $21,783 at Keene.

The tuition freeze also doesn’t help out-of-state students, who will see their tuition rates rise by 1 percent at UNH, 2.8 percent at Keene State, 3 percent at Plymouth State and 3.4 percent at Granite State College.

The University System has struggled to deal with the historic cuts it has faced since 2011.

Todd Leach, president of Granite State University and recently elected chancellor of the University System, told The Telegraph this spring that the system saw a 13 percent decline in applications and enrollment of first-time freshmen after the cuts, as students opted for less expensive out-of-state programs.

And research has shown the state is losing its young people at an alarming rate, with nearly half its college-age residents heading elsewhere for school and careers.

Leach said Friday that all of the new state aid will go directly to local students, a boost officials hope will help improve access to higher education. The restored funding will also provide additional scholarships for the state’s neediest and highest-achieving students.

On Thursday, the Community College System of New Hampshire voted to freeze its tuition for the 2013-14 school year. While that freeze doesn’t extend for two years, it does apply to out-of-state students. It marks the fourth time since 2006 that the system hasn’t raised its tuition.

College presidents spoke about the tuition freeze Friday, thanking the governor and legislators for their support in the new budget.

“We are all very appreciative of the statewide advocacy in support of the budget restoration,” University of New Hampshire President Mark Huddleston said.

“From Day One, the business community, alumni, parents and students joined in recognizing the vital role our institutions play in offering a first-class education to our students and playing a crucial role in keeping our state’s economy strong.”

Danielle Curtis can be reached
at 594-6557 or dcurtis@nashua
telegraph.com. Also, follow Curtis on Twitter (Telegraph_DC).