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Sunday, July 13, 2014

Farm exhibit to open at Nashua Historical Society

NASHUA – The Nashua Historical Society will host an opening for a new exhibit, “Settling the Lands of Old Dunstable: Farms and Agriculture in the Early Days of Nashua,” at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 17, in its Frank B. Clancy Library at the Speare Memorial Museum, 5 Abbott St.

After viewing the exhibit, attendees are invited to an ice cream social featuring Hayward’s ice cream. ...

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NASHUA – The Nashua Historical Society will host an opening for a new exhibit, “Settling the Lands of Old Dunstable: Farms and Agriculture in the Early Days of Nashua,” at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 17, in its Frank B. Clancy Library at the Speare Memorial Museum, 5 Abbott St.

After viewing the exhibit, attendees are invited to an ice cream social featuring Hayward’s ice cream.

Twelve farm properties are highlighted in the exhibit, including the Hayward Farms property, where the Nashua Mall is now located.

Part of the exhibit will be selections from “The History of Old Dunstable” by Charles J. Fox, including:

“In the beginning, circa 1655, the General Assembly of Massachusetts began granting tracts of land along both sides of the Merrimack River, north from Chelmsford, Mass., to the Souhegan River. These grants were referred to as Farms and the total area comprised over 14,000 acres. The various individuals who received these exclusive right of ownership, by reason of status or high esteem, were known as Proprietors.”

Since only a few settlements had been made in this region, “It became necessary, therefore, to consolidate all the grants into one Plantation and to secure to the inhabitants all privileges and immunities of an incorporated Township.

“Following a petition to the General Assembly, Old Dunstable was granted its charter of township on Oct. 26, 1673, dependent upon a number of conditions: that a competent number of actual settlers (20 or more) be living on the Farm, that a Meeting House be constructed and a minister obtained, and that each settler have a house lot of 10 acres minimum on the Planation to clear, fence, turn the soil, build a house, live upon and cultivate land within three years from the date of the charter of Township.”

And farm they did, as is shown in Nashua’s earliest farm history exhibit.