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Sunday, May 25, 2014

Finally in a long-term home, DataGravity gears up for eventual product launch

NASHUA – A good tech ecosystem needs a mix of the old and new – but it doesn’t usually involve the exact same person on the exact same floor of the exact same building.

“I ran the VMS engineering group (at Oracle), not only in the same building but on this floor,” said Steve Noyes, who was recently hired as vice president of engineering for DataGravity, a “big data” start-up that has managed to be well publicized and mostly hidden at the same time. ...

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NASHUA – A good tech ecosystem needs a mix of the old and new – but it doesn’t usually involve the exact same person on the exact same floor of the exact same building.

“I ran the VMS engineering group (at Oracle), not only in the same building but on this floor,” said Steve Noyes, who was recently hired as vice president of engineering for DataGravity, a “big data” start-up that has managed to be well publicized and mostly hidden at the same time.

CEO Paula Long is almost as connected: “I was actually one floor down for a number of years.”

DataGravity, founded in May 2012, recently moved into 100 Innovation Way. Long described the site as “one of the old Digital buildings,” now part of the huge Gateway Hills development off Spit Brook Road near Exit 1 of the F.E. Everette Turnpike. Digital Equipment Corp. was bought in 1998, but its memory as a New Hampshire tech pioneer lives on.

But DataGravity didn’t move to 100 Innovation Way from temporary space on Tara Boulevard for the history. Long said this will be the home for the company as it grows from the current 80 people.

The developer “John Flatley Co. has been amazing to us. They helped us with the transition and the move, been a great business partner,” Long said.

First DataGravity needs a product, however.

The firm was founded on the promise of helping mid-sized business make sense of, and get value from, the deluge of information available from industry software.

“There’s a new phrase in the tech world: dark data. It means you’ve got a bunch of structured or unstructured data you can’t get any insight into,” Long said. “Our goal is to turn that container into a business partner.”

The company drew attention from the start because of co-founders Long and John Joseph.

Long was one of the founders of EqualLogic, a Nashua-based
storage networking firm was started in a private home and eventually bought in 2008 by Dell for $1.4 billion. Joseph was an early executive there.

That track record has attracted venture capital investment, including $30 million in January 2013.

“We’re very well capitalized,” Long said.

She said DataGravity would have a “private beta” soon and planned to release a product by the end of the year.

The hiring of Noyes is a sign that it’s moving ahead.

Noyes, 59, who is about to move to Nashua with his wife and three children, comes from Oracle, where he was a vice president of engineering and helped the company advance its virtualization strategies for the small- and medium-sized business and larger enterprise markets.

Long described Noyes as valuable for a record in start-ups and large companies and in “growing a small team into an appropriate size engineering team,” a track record overseeing products and experience in a number of technologist, including clusters, operating systems, networks virtualization and file systems.

“I was interested in joining a company that is doing something innovative and new and revolutionary,” Noyes said.

David Brooks can be reached at 594-6531 or dbrooks@nashua
telegraph.com. Also, follow Brooks on Twitter (@GraniteGeek).