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Thursday, June 13, 2013

Apple plans music service, mobile software

SAN FRANCISCO – Apple is switching from its decade-long practice of naming its Mac operating system updates after big cats. Instead, it’s paying homage to the geography of its home state.

Apple software head Craig Federighi says the next version of Mac OS X will be called “Mavericks,” after an undersea rock formation that produces big waves near Half Moon Bay, Calif. ...

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SAN FRANCISCO – Apple is switching from its decade-long practice of naming its Mac operating system updates after big cats. Instead, it’s paying homage to the geography of its home state.

Apple software head Craig Federighi says the next version of Mac OS X will be called “Mavericks,” after an undersea rock formation that produces big waves near Half Moon Bay, Calif.

The new operating system will extend battery life and shorten boot-up times, Federighi told the audience at the Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco on Monday.

The system improves support for multiple displays and imports the “tab” concept from Web browsers to the Finder file-organizer.

The software update will include “iBooks” for the first time, giving people who buy e-books from Apple a way to display them on the computer screen in addition to the iPhone and iPad. Competing e-book vendors such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble have cross-platform applications already.

There have been nine OS X versions named after big cats. The latest was “Mountain Lion,” released last year.

“We do not want to be the first software release in history to be delayed by a lack of cats,” Federighi joked.

He said the new software will be out in the fall.

Apple also revealed a complete revamp of the Mac Pro, the boxy desktop model that’s the work horse of graphics and film professionals. The new model is a black cylinder, one eighth the volume of the old box.

The current Mac Pro is the only Mac with internal hardware that can easily be modified and expanded by the user, but that possibility disappears with the new model. The company is adopting the same compact, one-piece design present in the Mac Mini and iMac.

The new Mac Pro will be the first Mac to be assembled in the U.S. in many years.

CEO Tim Cook promised last year that the company would start a production line in the U.S., but didn’t say where.

The new computer will launch later this year, Schiller said.

This week’s event comes at an important time for Apple. The company’s stock price has fallen amid concerns that another breakthrough product isn’t imminent. Although CEO Tim Cook has said people shouldn’t expect new products until the fall, Apple is likely to preview how future products will function in its unveiling of new services and features.

Microsoft’s radical makeover of the Windows operating system in October was meant to give the company a stronger presence on tablet computers, but it ended up confusing many people who had become accustomed to using the old operating system on traditional desktops and laptops. IDC blamed Windows 8 for accelerating a decline in PC sales.

Apple riled users of its gadgets last fall when it kicked out a beloved app using Google’s mapping service and replaced it with its own Maps app. Travelers complained of misplaced landmarks, overlooked towns and other problems. What was supposed to be a triumph for Apple served to underscore Google’s strength in maps. Cook issued a rare public apology and promised improvements.